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Interview thank you email title
August 29, 2018 Holiday Thanks No comments

There are many components of a successful job interview, including thorough preparation, confident body language, professional presentation, and clear articulation of your skills and experience. Once you’ve mastered all of these details and walk out of the interview, it can be easy to overlook a last important step: the thank you email.

Many job seekers, especially Big Interview readers, understand that it is a good practice to promptly send a thank you email to their interviewer. How and what to say, however, may be less clear.

Although it is highly likely you expressed polite thanks to your interviewer in person, an intentional, well-worded note of thanks can separate you from the competition and keep you fresh in the interviewer’s mind.

Why Send a Post-Interview “Thank You” Email?

A thank you note is considered a common courtesy after a job interview and demonstrates polished professionalism. Showing your appreciation for your interviewer’s time will solidify the rapport you established. Conversely, the absence of this gesture, at a time where putting your best foot forward is expected, could hurt your chances of landing the job.

Beyond exercising manners and business etiquette, the thank-you email presents you with a golden opportunity to re-sell yourself.

Perhaps you missed cues to present some of your talking points, leaving your interviewer without a full understanding of your skills. Your thank-you email is your chance to fill any possible gap and reinforce your fit for the job.

Timing is Everything

Of the factors that contribute to an effective thank-you note, the timing is perhaps the most sensitive. You’ll want to begin writing your email as soon as possible to ensure you have time to make it great.

The completed thank-you email should arrive in the interviewer’s inbox within 24 hours of the interview. Too much later, and you may have already been forgotten.

Note: Email thank-you notes are now considered the standard and always appropriate. We are often asked about when it would be better to write and mail a physical thank-you note.

It’s always possible that some, more traditional interviewers may appreciate receiving a thank-you note or card in the mail. It’s true that a mailed card will may help you stand out.

However, there’s also a chance this gesture could make you seem less responsive (takes longer) or tech-savvy. I would recommend sending your thanks via email in almost all cases. If you are dealing with a more traditional interviewer or company, you can address this in the tone and content of your thank-you email.

Be sure to steer clear of odd hours of the night. If the interviewer even manages to find your email buried in memos and junk mail, it may seem strange that you were up at 3am.

If you can manage it, one effective strategy is to send the email around the time when the interviewer first arrives at work the next morning; your note will be front and center.

Anatomy of the Ideal Interview Thank You Email – from Top to Bottom

Subject Line: Definitely include one. An email with a “no subject” line comes across as lazy and is easy to ignore. When you create your subject line, it should be specific and attention grabbing, but don’t try to be too creative. Make it clear what the email will be about by using the words “thank you” and perhaps the position title.

Salutation: When addressing your note, keep it professional, and accurate. Writing down “Dear Mr./Ms./Dr. *Last Name*” is always a solid choice. Make sure you know exactly how the interviewer’s last name is spelled. (If you have multiple interviewers, send separate emails, and double check to make sure you have correct names and emails matched up properly).

Be careful to check your assumptions! For instance, if the interviewer was a woman, do not assume that you can address her as “Mrs.,” even if you know she is married. Stick to “Ms.” in this case and you will be safe. (And make sure you always use the “Dr.” prefix when applicable!)

Opening paragraph: Now comes the part where you say, “thank you.” Begin your note with a sincere expression of gratitude for the time that was taken to speak with you (e.g “I appreciate the time you took to speak with me…”)

After this, you will want to grab their attention with a compliment about the interview process in some way, a key takeaway about the position or company that excites you, and how this takeaway solidifies your confidence in your ability to be the best fit for the job.

This will help the recruiter feel good about reading your note, let them know you paid attention, and reassure them of your interest.

Body: While keeping your email brief, you can use an additional 1-2 paragraphs to remind the interviewer of your best selling points and continue building rapport. Here are some ideas:

Focus on your fit. Confidently assert your top selling points that align with the top job requirements. This can be an opportunity to mention something that didn’t come up in the interview or that you feel, in retrospect, you didn’t articulate well.

Reference something specific about your conversation.This helps to show you were interested and listening and may jog the reader’s memory about your interview.

Reiterate your interest. You can mention how the interview (and perhaps specific information provided by the interview) made you even more interested in the opportunity. Or if you forgot to ask good questions at the end of the interview, you may include one here, as an alternate way of showing your interest and engagement.

Keep tone in mind. Be professional, but also aware of the culture of the office. For example, if your desired position requires creativity or upbeat customer relations, make sure your note doesn’t come off too stiff.

Know your reader. Tailor your note to what you know about the reader. If you’re dealing with a busy senior manager, keep the note short and sweet and focused on the bottom line. If your interviewer was very focused on a particular job requirement, think about leading with a comment about it.

In all cases, remember to be professional, concise, and to the point.

Conclusion: It is always appropriate to say “thank you” again in some way as you are wrapping up your note. You can also use your conclusion to emphasize your interest in the position and express your desire to move forward in the hiring process.

If the interviewer mentioned a specific time frame in which to expect a follow-up, it is okay to reference that in your conclusion.

However, if no time frame was mentioned, creating one of your own (e.g “I look forward to hearing back from you next week”) may come across as pushy.

You should also include an invitation for the interviewer to contact you at any time if they have further questions (make sure your contact info is included in the sentence or in your email signature!). This is a subtle inclusion in the interview thank you email that candidates often forget.

Sign off: The tried and true signature of “Sincerely, Your First and Last Name” is always a safe bet. If another sign off has worked for you in a professional setting before, especially if it found you success on your cover letter, then stick with it.

Below your signature, make sure to include your full contact information, and any relevant links, such as a LinkedIn profile or online portfolio.

Interview “Thank You” Sample Email (and Template)

Subject Line: Thank You Senior Project Manager Interview

Dear Ms. Smith,

I greatly appreciate the time you took to meet with me yesterday afternoon to discuss the Senior Project Manager Position. I enjoyed learning more about the company and especially the details you shared about the collaborative culture, which is something I really value.

I am now even more excited about the position and my fit for the role. In addition to my record of organizing successful project launches under strict deadlines, I also have extensive multimedia production and editing experience.

I also have experience successfully streamlining project processes in my current role and know that skill would be valuable in meeting your goals for making processes more consistent across the team.

Please let me know if there is any additional information you need from me. Thank you again for your time. I hope to hear back from you and have the opportunity to continue our discussion about the role.

Sincerely,
First Name Last Name”

[email address]

[phone number]

[links]

Why This Thank-You Email Works

For starters, this note is delivered in a timely manner (within 24 hours of the interview). The subject line makes it obvious to the recruiter that this is a thank-you note.

The greeting uses the appropriate title and sounds professional.

This note starts out well by showing gratitude and referencing specific, helpful information provided in the interview.

In the body, the job seeker reiterates enthusiasm for the role and then summarizes his key selling points for the position. The third paragraph references new information shared in the interview (goal of making processes more consistent) and how this candidate could be an asset.

In the conclusion, the writer offers to provide any additional information needed and expresses interest in moving forward in the process.

Overall, it’s a concise, professional note that shows the candidate was paying attention and reinforces both a positive attitude and positive qualifications for the position.

Smoothing out the Edges

When you have a draft of your interview thank-you email complete, you will want to proofread it at least twice. You don’t want to rely on the spellcheck and grammar correction tools alone.

Double-check the spelling of names, your sentence structure, and if any words you intended to use are missing. After you have done your best to polish your thank-you email draft, get a second pair of eyes on it if you can. You will be surprised at how quickly a fresh perspective will reveal some of the details you may have overlooked.

Thank-You Emails for Panel Interviews

You did get a business card from each interviewer, right? They will prove to be very helpful when faced with writing thank-you notes after a panel interview.

If more than one person was involved in your interview process, each person should receive an individualized thank-you email. While this may seem time consuming, it can set you apart from other of candidates. After all, each member of the panel was there because they have a vote in the hiring process. You want to win all of them over.

Do your best to remember highlights of the interview from each person involved. You may even consider refreshing your memory by writing notes on the back of each business card as soon as you return from your interview. Include a few unique details in each of your thank-you notes to create a genuine reconnection with everyone involved in your interview process, and to ideally get them talking to each other about wanting to hire you.

With the job market as competitive as it is, job seekers need to do everything they can to connect with interviewers and stand out from the competition. Using these tools, your carefully-constructed thank-you email could be what closes the deal and earns you the job offer.

(For even more advice on thank you notes, read our full lessons inside the Big Interview curriculum, or check out our post Job Interview Thank You Notes 101)

Alia Hollback

A lot has changed in the job interview process over the past few years. It's not unusual to be asked to participate in a video interview, to provide links to your social media pages in order to demonstrate your personal brand, or to do some sample work on spec to prove that you're qualified for the job. One thing that hasn't changed, however, is the need to send a thank-you note to your interviewers to express your appreciation for the opportunity to meet with them.

The good news is that you can generally send your thank you note via email–a paper letter isn’t usually necessary.

The Benefits of Sending a Thank-You Email

A thank-you message via email has a couple of important advantages over the old-fashioned, paper-and-ink variety of a thank-you letter. For example, with an email, you can do more than remind your prospective employer of your qualities and skills–you can actually show them off by including a link to your online portfolio, LinkedIn account, or professional social networking profiles.

Another benefit of a thank-you email is that you can get your thank-you message out immediately, rather than having to wait for the postal service to deliver a letter. In fact, you can send and write your thank-you email on the same day.

This is crucial if you’ve just interviewed for a job in which the hiring manager will be making a quick decision. You want to send the letter when the interviewer’s impression of you is still sharp in his or her mind. You also want the interviewer to read the letter before making a hiring decision. This means that you should send the email message or letter within 24 hours of your interview.

Send One Email to Each Interviewer

What if you’re interviewed by several people? First of all, ask for a business card at the conclusion of the interview–that way you'll have the contact information for each thank-you email. Then, send email messages to each person you interviewed with.

What to Include in Your Email Message

In addition to thanking the person you interviewed with, your thank-you note should reinforce the fact that you want the job, so view this thank-you as a follow-up "sales" letter. In other words, restate why you want the job, what your qualifications are, how you might make significant contributions, and so on.

Your message is also the perfect opportunity to discuss anything of importance that your interviewer neglected to ask. For example, if you didn’t have a chance to explain why you thought that you would fit in well with the company culture, you might briefly state this in the email.

Finally, use your letter to address any issues and concerns that came up during the interview, including topics you neglected to answer as thoroughly as you might have wished. For instance, if you feel that you botched an interview question, you could explain your answer in more detail here.

Keep in mind, though, that the thank-you note should be brief and to-the-point. A couple of brief paragraphs are sufficient. Here are tips for writing a strong thank-you email.

Use a Professional Subject Line

In the subject line, provide just enough information about why you are sending the email. Include the phrase “thank you” and either your name or the title of the job you interviewed for (or both). Some examples of subject lines include:

  • Thank You–Firstname Lastname
  • Thank You–Job Title
  • Thank You–Firstname Lastname, Job Title
  • Thank You–Job Title, Firstname Lastname
  • Job Title, Firstname Lastname–Thank You

Keep It Brief

Keep your message concise. The interviewer will not want to read a very long thank-you email. Focus on saying “thank you” and briefly reiterating your interest in the position.

Proofread and Edit

Remember to proofread. Proofreading is just as important in email as it is in other forms of correspondence. Be sure to check spelling and grammar. Also, keep a copy in your "Out" mailbox or “cc:” yourself so you have a copy of each message you've sent.

Example of an Email Thank-You Letter to Send After a Job Interview

The example below will provide you with a template to use for your own thank-you email. Keep in mind that this sample is only to give you a sense of how to format your email and demonstrate what information should be included. You’ll need to tailor it to reflect your own circumstances.

Review More Examples

Thank-You Email Do's and Don'ts

There’s a lot of information in this article, so here’s a checklist of everything you should and should not do:

Do: 

  • Send your email right away—within 24 hours of the interview—to thank the hiring managers and confirm your interest. 
  • Include all your interviewers in the email or send separate emails to each person who spoke with you. Keep in mind that if you do the latter, your messages should vary somewhat, so that the recipients don't compare notes later and feel like they just got a chain email (as mentioned above, it’s a good idea to gather business cards, or make a note of the interviewers’ names during the meeting. This is to ensure that you know whom to address).
  • Include the name of the position in the subject line and the words "thank you." This will ensure that the hiring manager sees your response and knows that your email is important.
  • Remind the interviewer of your qualifications, making sure to mention any keywords in the original job listing (or those that came up during the interview itself).
  • Provide links to your online portfolios and other professional sites and networks.

Don't: 

  • Stalk your interviewers. Initiatives such as a thank-you email and a follow-up a week or so later are more than enough. Beyond that, you're not promoting yourself; you're stressing them out. Remember that your goal is not only to show the hiring managers that you’re qualified but to convince them that they want to work with you. Repeatedly hounding them with follow-up emails won’t build your case.
  • Send anything that makes you look bad. This includes personal social media profiles that contain unprofessional pictures or behavior. Err on the side of caution when determining this. You might see nothing wrong with a photo of you enjoying a margarita on a tropical vacation, but the hiring manager might feel differently.
  • Be too casual. No memes, internet acronyms, etc.
  • Send misspelled, grammatically incorrect emails, or anything that hasn't been proofread by a trusted friend. Even professional editors make mistakes when they try to work on their own. Get another set of eyeballs to look over your work before you hit "send."

By sending a thoughtfully expressed “thank-you” email immediately after your interview, you’ll affirm the positive impressions you made during your talk, keep your candidacy “top of mind” as final hiring decisions are made, and demonstrate that you have the good manners and proactive communications skills employers desire in their personnel.

Be sure to modify your email so each interviewer gets a unique thank-you message. They will know if you sent the same message to each of them.

Subject Line of the Message: Thank You–Assistant Account Executive Interview

Dear Mr./Ms. Last Name:

I enjoyed speaking with you today about the assistant account executive position at the Smith Agency. The job seems to be an excellent match for my skills and interests.

The creative approach to account management that you described confirmed my desire to work with you.

In addition to my enthusiasm, I will bring to the position strong writing skills, assertiveness, and the ability to encourage others to work cooperatively with the department.

I appreciate the time you took to interview me. I am very interested in working for you and look forward to hearing from you regarding this position.

Sincerely,

Your Name
Email Address
Address
City, State Zip Code
Phone Number
[LinkedIn URL]
[Website URL]

Essentially, that subject line is your second impression (the first being your actual interview) and it will also be.

So, you had a job interview. Great!

Before you sit back and begin your waiting game, we’re here to tell you that your work is not done. Nope! You may be thinking that you kicked butt at your interview and, obviously, you’re a shoo-in. Or… maybe not. But did you know that your interview actually isn’t over yet? Yup, you’re still in the spotlight and, even if your interview went great, you can still mess up your job prospects.

Don’t sweat it! We want to tell you how you can help to seal the deal, or at the very least get some clarity about your chances of getting the job. We’re here to talk about two types of emails you should be sending your prospective employer after your interview.

The first type of email we’re going to talk about should ALWAYS be sent.

Always always always always.

Always. Send. A thank you.

The thank you email

The nice thing about the Thank You email is that you really shouldn’t have to think too much about it. Think: short, sweet, and polite. That being said, there are a couple best practices to follow when sending your thank-you note.

Do send your thank you note very soon after the interview, preferably within 24 hours.

Do make sure to address your interviewer(s) by name and send it to each person who interviewed you.

Do include the words “Thank You” in the subject line so your interviewers understand that you’re not trying to hound them about the job right after the interview. Also include the title of the position you were applying for to jog their memory. Something like “Interview for Data Analyst Position Thank You.”

Do briefly mention your qualifications again.

Don’t be long-winded. This isn’t your cover letter: round 2. While it is ok to restate why you think you’d be a great fit for the job as well as address some concerns the hiring manager may have had, it’s important to think of their time and keep your note to the point.

Don’t make spelling or grammar mistakes. Even if you had a great interview, this could hurt you, a lot.

Pro tip: The key is to be genuine. Be genuine and friendly during the interview so you have something real to mention in your thank-you note and then be genuinely grateful that you’re being considered for the position. Even if you’re nervous about getting the job, try to believe that you really are the best person for the job and your potential employer will think so too.

According to this survey, 80% of HR managers said it was either somewhat helpful or very helpful when they receive a thank you message from a candidate. Despite this, the study also said that only 24% of candidates ever sent a thank you note. 

Basically, if you’ve been looking for a way to stand out, this could be it.

Here’s an example of what your thank your message could look like:

Hello [HIRING MANAGER NAME],

It was great to meet you in person! Thank you for having me by the office today and taking the time to talk more about [YOUR COMPANY AND THE ROLE I’M APPLYING FOR]. It was also great meeting with [ANYONE ELSE YOU MET WITH] and learning about their experience at the company and getting some more detail on the day-to-day of a [POSITION TITLE]. Overall, our meeting was very helpful and informative.

I’m excited about where [COMPANY] is headed and believe I can do a lot to contribute to [COMPANY]’s success. My conversations with you confirmed that the [POSITION TITLE] role provides the perfect chance to be challenged and learn about the [THE COMPANY’S INDUSTRY] in a collaborative, [COMPANY CULTURE ATTIRBUTE] environment. I’d be excited to use my experience [STATE RELEVANT EXPERIENCE HERE] to help your company meet its goal of [INSERT GOAL DISCUSSED DURING INTERVIEW].

Please let me know if there is any other information I can provide, I’d be happy to follow up on anything we discussed or provide samples of my work.

All my best,

[YOUR NAME]

[YOUR PHONE NUMBER]

[YOUR EMAIL]

Michelle, who works with many candidates here at Scouted and coaches them through the application an interview process, tells why she believes this is a great thank you email:

“[It’s] long enough to show that [the candidate] put thought into it but concise and to the point and appropriately reinforces his or her interest in the role with specific reasons why. It mentions each of the people the candidate met along with references to specific things from those chats. It was also enthusiastic and positive without using too many “!”s.

Now we get to our second type of follow-up email…

The “I haven’t heard anything from you in a week or more” follow-up email

Now is the time when you become frustratingly familiar with the last email that popped into your inbox, desperately waiting for a new, unread email to come in with your interviewer’s name on it.

You may be tempted to forgo a follow up altogether imagining the complete worst case scenario: Did the manager laugh at you as soon as you left the room? Did you horribly offend them? Bore them? Did they right through your fear of feeling like an imposter?

Here’s what we’re going to tell you:

Hiring managers are busy. They’re real people with a real workload, which, consequently, might be heavier than usual seeing as they’re needing to hire someone.

Some hiring managers might even be happy to see your email pop into their inbox and think, “Right! I was supposed to email them 3 days ago!”

It’s with this mindset that you should follow up with your interviewer. If you were given a date on which they said they would get back to you and that date has come and gone, then feel free to type up your email. If you weren’t given a date but it’s been over a week’s time and you haven’t heard from your interviewer, type away.

Click here to get our very own resume template.

Here are a few guidelines you should follow when following up after an interview.

  • Always assume they’ve been busy.

  • Always be polite (I mean, of course, right?) and thank them for interviewing you in the first place.

  • Remind them of your interview (bring up something specific you discussed so they remember you).

  • Address any concerns they may have had about you and reassure them that you’re a great fit for the position.

  • Restate why you’d be a great fit for the role.

  • Ask if there is anything else or more information they need from you.

  • Leave a way to contact you, just in case.

Here’s an example of what a follow up email can look like:

Dear [HIRING MANAGER NAME]

I hope you’re doing well!

I just wanted to take another moment to thank you for taking the time to interview me last week for the [POSITION YOU APPLIED FOR] role. Again, I would be excited to fill the role and believe I’d be a great fit due to my experience [FILL IN WITH A PIECE OF RELEVANT PAST EXPERIENCE] and could help your company [FILL IN WITH A GOAL THAT WAS MENTIONED DURING YOUR INTERVIEW]. Let me know if you need any other information from me or have any further questions.

Looking forward to talking soon,

[YOUR NAME]

[YOUR PHONE NUMBER]

[YOUR EMAIL]

Again, you shouldn’t ever worry about sending a follow-up email to a prospective employer as long as you keep it short and sweet, grateful, and not pushy. As long as you follow these guidelines, your email will simply help to show off your interest and enthusiasm about the position.

Got some follow-up or thank-you email advice of your own? What was the best follow up message you ever wrote? Share your examples in the comments below!

How to Write a Thank You or Follow Up Email After an Interview

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There are many components of a successful job interview, including thorough preparation, confident body language, professional presentation, and clear articulation of your skills and experience. Once you’ve mastered all of these details and walk out of the interview, it can be easy to overlook a last important step: the thank you email.

Many job seekers, especially Big Interview readers, understand that it is a good practice to promptly send a thank you email to their interviewer. How and what to say, however, may be less clear.

Although it is highly likely you expressed polite thanks to your interviewer in person, an intentional, well-worded note of thanks can separate you from the competition and keep you fresh in the interviewer’s mind.

Why Send a Post-Interview “Thank You” Email?

A thank you note is considered a common courtesy after a job interview and demonstrates polished professionalism. Showing your appreciation for your interviewer’s time will solidify the rapport you established. Conversely, the absence of this gesture, at a time where putting your best foot forward is expected, could hurt your chances of landing the job.

Beyond exercising manners and business etiquette, the thank-you email presents you with a golden opportunity to re-sell yourself.

Perhaps you missed cues to present some of your talking points, leaving your interviewer without a full understanding of your skills. Your thank-you email is your chance to fill any possible gap and reinforce your fit for the job.

Timing is Everything

Of the factors that contribute to an effective thank-you note, the timing is perhaps the most sensitive. You’ll want to begin writing your email as soon as possible to ensure you have time to make it great.

The completed thank-you email should arrive in the interviewer’s inbox within 24 hours of the interview. Too much later, and you may have already been forgotten.

Note: Email thank-you notes are now considered the standard and always appropriate. We are often asked about when it would be better to write and mail a physical thank-you note.

It’s always possible that some, more traditional interviewers may appreciate receiving a thank-you note or card in the mail. It’s true that a mailed card will may help you stand out.

However, there’s also a chance this gesture could make you seem less responsive (takes longer) or tech-savvy. I would recommend sending your thanks via email in almost all cases. If you are dealing with a more traditional interviewer or company, you can address this in the tone and content of your thank-you email.

Be sure to steer clear of odd hours of the night. If the interviewer even manages to find your email buried in memos and junk mail, it may seem strange that you were up at 3am.

If you can manage it, one effective strategy is to send the email around the time when the interviewer first arrives at work the next morning; your note will be front and center.

Anatomy of the Ideal Interview Thank You Email – from Top to Bottom

Subject Line: Definitely include one. An email with a “no subject” line comes across as lazy and is easy to ignore. When you create your subject line, it should be specific and attention grabbing, but don’t try to be too creative. Make it clear what the email will be about by using the words “thank you” and perhaps the position title.

Salutation: When addressing your note, keep it professional, and accurate. Writing down “Dear Mr./Ms./Dr. *Last Name*” is always a solid choice. Make sure you know exactly how the interviewer’s last name is spelled. (If you have multiple interviewers, send separate emails, and double check to make sure you have correct names and emails matched up properly).

Be careful to check your assumptions! For instance, if the interviewer was a woman, do not assume that you can address her as “Mrs.,” even if you know she is married. Stick to “Ms.” in this case and you will be safe. (And make sure you always use the “Dr.” prefix when applicable!)

Opening paragraph: Now comes the part where you say, “thank you.” Begin your note with a sincere expression of gratitude for the time that was taken to speak with you (e.g “I appreciate the time you took to speak with me…”)

After this, you will want to grab their attention with a compliment about the interview process in some way, a key takeaway about the position or company that excites you, and how this takeaway solidifies your confidence in your ability to be the best fit for the job.

This will help the recruiter feel good about reading your note, let them know you paid attention, and reassure them of your interest.

Body: While keeping your email brief, you can use an additional 1-2 paragraphs to remind the interviewer of your best selling points and continue building rapport. Here are some ideas:

Focus on your fit. Confidently assert your top selling points that align with the top job requirements. This can be an opportunity to mention something that didn’t come up in the interview or that you feel, in retrospect, you didn’t articulate well.

Reference something specific about your conversation.This helps to show you were interested and listening and may jog the reader’s memory about your interview.

Reiterate your interest. You can mention how the interview (and perhaps specific information provided by the interview) made you even more interested in the opportunity. Or if you forgot to ask good questions at the end of the interview, you may include one here, as an alternate way of showing your interest and engagement.

Keep tone in mind. Be professional, but also aware of the culture of the office. For example, if your desired position requires creativity or upbeat customer relations, make sure your note doesn’t come off too stiff.

Know your reader. Tailor your note to what you know about the reader. If you’re dealing with a busy senior manager, keep the note short and sweet and focused on the bottom line. If your interviewer was very focused on a particular job requirement, think about leading with a comment about it.

In all cases, remember to be professional, concise, and to the point.

Conclusion: It is always appropriate to say “thank you” again in some way as you are wrapping up your note. You can also use your conclusion to emphasize your interest in the position and express your desire to move forward in the hiring process.

If the interviewer mentioned a specific time frame in which to expect a follow-up, it is okay to reference that in your conclusion.

However, if no time frame was mentioned, creating one of your own (e.g “I look forward to hearing back from you next week”) may come across as pushy.

You should also include an invitation for the interviewer to contact you at any time if they have further questions (make sure your contact info is included in the sentence or in your email signature!). This is a subtle inclusion in the interview thank you email that candidates often forget.

Sign off: The tried and true signature of “Sincerely, Your First and Last Name” is always a safe bet. If another sign off has worked for you in a professional setting before, especially if it found you success on your cover letter, then stick with it.

Below your signature, make sure to include your full contact information, and any relevant links, such as a LinkedIn profile or online portfolio.

Interview “Thank You” Sample Email (and Template)

Subject Line: Thank You | Senior Project Manager Interview

Dear Ms. Smith,

I greatly appreciate the time you took to meet with me yesterday afternoon to discuss the Senior Project Manager Position. I enjoyed learning more about the company and especially the details you shared about the collaborative culture, which is something I really value.

I am now even more excited about the position and my fit for the role. In addition to my record of organizing successful project launches under strict deadlines, I also have extensive multimedia production and editing experience.

I also have experience successfully streamlining project processes in my current role and know that skill would be valuable in meeting your goals for making processes more consistent across the team.

Please let me know if there is any additional information you need from me. Thank you again for your time. I hope to hear back from you and have the opportunity to continue our discussion about the role.

Sincerely,
First Name Last Name”

[email address]

[phone number]

[links]

Why This Thank-You Email Works

For starters, this note is delivered in a timely manner (within 24 hours of the interview). The subject line makes it obvious to the recruiter that this is a thank-you note.

The greeting uses the appropriate title and sounds professional.

This note starts out well by showing gratitude and referencing specific, helpful information provided in the interview.

In the body, the job seeker reiterates enthusiasm for the role and then summarizes his key selling points for the position. The third paragraph references new information shared in the interview (goal of making processes more consistent) and how this candidate could be an asset.

In the conclusion, the writer offers to provide any additional information needed and expresses interest in moving forward in the process.

Overall, it’s a concise, professional note that shows the candidate was paying attention and reinforces both a positive attitude and positive qualifications for the position.

Smoothing out the Edges

When you have a draft of your interview thank-you email complete, you will want to proofread it at least twice. You don’t want to rely on the spellcheck and grammar correction tools alone.

Double-check the spelling of names, your sentence structure, and if any words you intended to use are missing. After you have done your best to polish your thank-you email draft, get a second pair of eyes on it if you can. You will be surprised at how quickly a fresh perspective will reveal some of the details you may have overlooked.

Thank-You Emails for Panel Interviews

You did get a business card from each interviewer, right? They will prove to be very helpful when faced with writing thank-you notes after a panel interview.

If more than one person was involved in your interview process, each person should receive an individualized thank-you email. While this may seem time consuming, it can set you apart from other of candidates. After all, each member of the panel was there because they have a vote in the hiring process. You want to win all of them over.

Do your best to remember highlights of the interview from each person involved. You may even consider refreshing your memory by writing notes on the back of each business card as soon as you return from your interview. Include a few unique details in each of your thank-you notes to create a genuine reconnection with everyone involved in your interview process, and to ideally get them talking to each other about wanting to hire you.

With the job market as competitive as it is, job seekers need to do everything they can to connect with interviewers and stand out from the competition. Using these tools, your carefully-constructed thank-you email could be what closes the deal and earns you the job offer.

(For even more advice on thank you notes, read our full lessons inside the Big Interview curriculum, or check out our post Job Interview Thank You Notes 101)

Alia Hollback

Immediately after your interview, carefully email your thank as soon after the interview as possible. Subject: Thank you for the [Job Title] interview on [date].

11+ Thank You Email After Teaching Interview – PDF, DOC

Job Interview Thank You Email (with Samples)

By Susan P. Joyce

A major benefit of emailed thank you notes is that they can be sent -- and received -- very quickly.

A traditional handwritten thank you will take at least one day to be delivered and, depending on the organization, may sit in the mail room or on someone's desk for several days before it is read.

Surveys by both CareerBuilder and Accountemps have indicated that an emailed thank you note is acceptable to most employers in the USA.

However, if the organization feels very "old school," consider sending a formal thank you via USPS (a.k.a. "snail mail") in an envelope with a stamp as a follow up to your emailed thank you.

Remember that employers will view your thank you notes as a "work sample" demonstrating the kind of employee you would be. So, focus on sending the most professional thank you notes that you can, with good spelling, grammar, and use of technology.

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Writing Your Thank You Message

Leave the TO: field empty until you have completed, spell checked, and proofread the message (or put your own address in that field until it is ready to be sent).

Adapt the text in this sample (below) to your circumstances, and customize it to each individual who interviewed you.

If you know the person who is receiving this message, you can be less formal, as in "Dear Mary" vs. "Dear Ms. Jones" -- but err on the side of being more formal rather than less formal when in doubt.

Don't make the mistake of sending exactly the same message to everyone who interviewed you at an employer! Emails are easy to share. Vary the details a bit, or use the second, more customizable sample below.

[More Interview Email Thank You Do's and Dont's.]

Sample Thank You Messages

Replace thetext below [in brackets] with whatever terms are appropriate for you and your situation. Send this very soon after the interview, preferably on the same day as the interview.

Simple Thank You Message Sample

This is a basic, simple thank you message.

Subject: Thank you for the [Job Title] interview on [date]

Dear [Mr./Ms. Last Name]:

Thank you very much for your time today [or yesterday or the date] to interview me for the position of [job title]. I appreciate the opportunity to learn more about this job, to meet you and [names of other interviewers], and to see your facility [or offices, location, whatever is appropriate].

As we discussed, I have [months or years] of experience with [technology, tools, or qualification(s) you have that seemed most important in the interview]. With my background and experience, I believe that I could become a contributor to your team very quickly.

I am excited about this opportunity to join [organization name]. Please do not hesitate to email or call me if you have any questions or need any additional information.

I look forward to hearing from you [whenever they said they would be in touch or in 10 days if they didn't give you a date].

Best regards,

[Your name]
[Your job title or tag line, like "eCommerce Customer Support Specialist"]
[LinkedIn Profile URL]
[Phone number -- not your work number if you are employed]

More Complex Thank You Message

Replace thetext below [in brackets] with whatever terms are appropriate for you and your situation.

Subject: Thank you for the [Job Title] interview on [date]

Dear [Mr./Ms. Last Name]:

Thank you very much for your time today [or yesterday or the date] to interview me for the position of [job title]. I appreciate the opportunity to learn more about this job, to meet you and [names of other interviewers], and to see your facility [or offices, location, whatever is appropriate].

[Reference anything you said that seemed important to the interviewer, like: As we discussed, I find the technology related to using cloud computing fascinating and an amazing opportunity for the future, but security is also a major concern. Keeping XYZ Company's information safe would be a top priority for the person in this job, and I would love to dig deeply into the protective technologies, as well as the threats, to avoid future problems.]

[If possible, reference any "connection" you may have made, like: I enjoyed finding someone else who attended XYZ College and also roots for the hockey team. Hope they make the NCAA Division finals next year!]

As we discussed, I have [months or years] of experience with [technology, tools, or qualification(s) you have that seemed most important in the interview]. With my background and experience, I believe that I could become a contributor to your team very quickly.

I am excited about this opportunity to join [organization name]. Please do not hesitate to email or call me if you have any questions or need any additional information.

I look forward to hearing from you [whenever they said they would be in touch or in 10 days if they didn't give you a date].

Best regards,

[Your name]
[Your job title or tag line, like "eCommerce Customer Support Specialist"]
[LinkedIn Profile URL]
[Phone number -- not your work number if you are employed]

[For more information: see Email Thank You Do's and Dont's and Guide to Interview Thank You Notes with more Interview Thank You Note Samples.]

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Staying in Touch After the Thank You's Are Sent

Hopefully, you will get an email in response to this message, but don't panic if you don't hear from them on their deadline. MUCH may be happening that has nothing to do with you at all.

Read 5 Absolute Must-Ask Questions for Your Next Job Interview to get the details you need about how their hiring process works so you have contacts and their guidlines.

If they said they would contact you in a week, DO reach outafter five business days to see what is happening if they have not contacted you when they said they would. If you forgot to ask when they would be contacting you after the interview, five business days is a sufficient gap to demonstrate that you are interested, but not a nuisance.

DO NOT contact them daily -- or even weekly -- for a decision.

DO move on with your job search. This opportunity may happen or it may not. Don't "pause" your job search until you know. Keep searching. Best case, you'll have a choice betweene two (or more) jobs to make. Worst case; you won't lose any momentum.

Bottom Line

It's easy to blow off thank you notes as trivial, but well-done thank you notes are a great way to differentiate yourself from other candidates. Take the time to follow the Email Thank You Do's and Dont's, and send your thank you notes very quickly. If you forgot to send immediate thank you messages, send them as soon as you can --better late than never! Good thank you notes demonstrate the high quality of your work, and all the characteristics you may claim, like: attention to detail, ability to communicate, comfort with technology, and knowledge about the job and the employer.

More About Interview Thank You Notes

[More: The Waiting Game After the Interview by recruiter Jeff Lipschultz and Job-Hunt's 2017 study, Job Seekers: What Happens After You Apply.]


About the author...

Online job search expert Susan P. Joyce has been observing the online job search world and teaching online job search skills since 1995. A veteran of the United States Marine Corps and a recent Visiting Scholar at the MIT Sloan School of Management, Susan is a two-time layoff “graduate” who has worked in human resources at Harvard University and in a compensation consulting firm. Since 1998, Susan has been editor and publisher of Job-Hunt.org. Follow Susan on Twitter at @jobhuntorg and on Facebook, LinkedIn.

interview thank you email title

Why Send a Thank You After Interview Email? While it's Subject: Thank You – Interview Follow Up Confirm the name, title, and email address of the person.

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