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Thank you letter to professor greeted friendly professional manner
September 06, 2018 Holiday Thanks 4 comments

This FREE thank you notes resource was written with you in mind. It has beautiful thank you card wording for all occasions. Here you’ll find over 500 beautifully-written wording examples to fire up your creativity as well as FREE greeting card printables and stylish gift ideas.

Express Gratitude

When it comes to expressing gratitude, nothing is more personal than a hand-written thank you note. It’s well known that sincere gestures of appreciation are the currency of good business and personal relationships. Thank you cards go a long way in establishing goodwill and trust. They help build those important social connections that give structure to our lives. Most of us can remember the names of the people and businesses who send us holiday greeting cards every year. And we definitely remember those who have taken the time to send us a courteous and prompt thank you note message to acknowledge our kindness in a special way. Who in your life right now deserves a few words of thanks?

HOW TO WRITE THANK YOU NOTES

* Begin by selecting a beautiful set of thank you cards
* Purchase stamps with a lovely design
* Select a quality pen with ink that doesn’t easily smudge
* Get ready to use your computer or a few pieces of scrap paper
* Choose a comfortable well-lit spot that’s perfect for writing
* Allow your thoughts to focus on feelings of gratitude
* Remember how you felt when receiving the kind gift or gesture
* Capture those warm emotions and allow them to build and overflow
* Use your computer or scrap paper for writing your rough draft
* In the body of your thank you note use warm words that show a personal connection
* Add specific details about the gift, favor, kindness or advice you received
* Include words of thanks or a lovely thank you phrase
* Spell check your rough draft
* Handwrite your thank you message on a hard-stock thank you card
* End your thank you note with your regards followed by a signature

HOW TO USE THIS THANK YOU NOTE SITE

To jumpstart your creativity browse through our extensive collection of thoughtful thank you card wording samples. You can use our professionally-written examples as your own personal thank you note template. There are thank you note categories for all occasions: wedding, baby shower, birthday, graduation, business, bereavement, teacher appreciation and many more! Choose your favorite thank you note examples within this site and then put your own special spin on the written content. You can often combine a few of the words and phrases from two or more thank you notes to create a completely unique message that’s all your own!

Thank You Note Categories Business + Personal

Advice Thank You Note Wording Examples
This is a lovely collection of wording examples for thanking those wonderful people in your life who have shown you a generous measure of kindness. Explore our treasure trove of phrasing.

Baby Shower Thank You Note Wording
Your FREE resource for how to write baby shower thank you notes. Thanking your baby shower guests for gifts just got easier. This page contains thoughtful wording examples that you can use right now to fly through that stack of thank you cards in style. Get ready to be inspired with the very best in baby shower thank you card wording!

Bachelorette Party Thanks
Woo-hoo! What a celebration! We’re ready to help you get started writing out thank you cards to your bridesmaids and friends. This treasure trove of wording and phrases were written to help you tap into your creativity and express your heartfelt thanks with beauty and confidence.

Bar Mitzvah & Bat Mitzvah Thank You Card Phrasing
You’ve just discovered a wonderful selection of thoughtfully-written thank you card excerpts for showing thanks to your guests and for all the gifts you received on your very special day.

Bereavement Thanks
Heartfelt wording examples for writing bereavement and funeral thank you cards for flowers, sympathy gifts, prayers and emotional support. Here’s how to best thank friends, family and your church community for reaching out and providing you with spiritual strength and comfort. This page offers a measure of love and assistance during a very difficult time. These beautiful examples of sympathy thank you notes are exactly what you need right now.

Birthday Gift Thank You Notes
This page is full of wonderful wording ideas for thanking friends and family for the sweet birthday gifts you received. More beautiful phrasing is added monthly to keep things fresh.

Boss / Employer Thank You Card Wording and Phrases
When writing thank you letters to your employer it’s best to keep things simple, business like and sincere. In most employment situations it’s wise to remember that your message of thanks should not be overly personal in nature. Here is a great collection of wording examples and ideas to help guide your way.

Bridal Shower Thank You Notes
FREE resource for how to write bridal shower thank you notes. If you’re feeling overwhelmed about writing out bridal shower thank you cards, we’re here to reduce the stress! Explore this FREE bridal shower resource. It’s now easier than ever to convey love and gratitude to your bridal shower guests. These thoughtfully-written bridal shower thank you notes are here to assist beautiful brides like you.

Business Referral Thanks
Build a network of satisfied clients by sending out a thank you card for each new business referral. If referrals and repeat customers are the life force of your business, this is something that needs your special attention! By acknowledging the kindness your business associates and friends have shown you, they will be willing to continue sending new customers and clients your way. Writing a business referral thank you note is quick and easy to do! Find the thank you card wording you’re looking for on this special page. Start growing and expanding your business today.

Christmas Gift Thank You Note Wording
Now that the holidays are over it’s important to sit down and write thoughtful letters of thanks to your friends, co-workers, neighbors and family members who shopped for the perfect gift to present to you during the holiday season. This page has plenty of wording examples to help you fill out your cards with perfect phrases of thanks.

Customer Thank You Notes
Customer thank you notes build and reinforce positive relationships, promote your brand, and encourage repeat business. This special collection of thank you note examples is a wonderful business resource. Use these wording examples to help you write a sincere letter of thanks to your valued customers and clients. See just how easy it is to write a customer appreciation message!

Dinner and Entertainment Thanks
Good etiquette dictates that after you’ve enjoyed a dinner and/or event at a friend or client’s home that you send a thoughtful handwritten thank you card within a few days after the meal or party. For close family members and more casual friendships an email thanks is absolutely fine.

Donation Thank You Letter Samples
This section offers professionally-worded thank you letter examples for donations received for non-profit organizations, schools, churches and more.

Employee Appreciation Thank You Cards
Whenever employees have gone over above what’s expected it’s important to recognize their accomplishments. Many employers add the engraved names of high-performing employees onto a group recognition plaque placed prominently in the workplace. But at the very least a thank you card should accompany a handshake and verbal thanks.

Farewell Goodbye Email Messages
Saying goodbye to work friends and colleagues isn’t easy. It can often be a challenge finding the right words to say in a goodbye email. To assist you out we’ve included examples of farewell emails that you can pull words and phrases from to create an email letter that reflects your sentiments. Likewise, employee departure emails can often be difficult to write. When it comes time for an employee to leave your company it’s good etiquette to send them off with well wishes and words of gratitude for the years of service they’ve given to growing your business and keeping your customers satisfied. These farewell email examples contain wording and phrasing that you can pull from when writing your goodbye email.

Father’s Day Thank You Cards
This cherished holiday is the perfect time to express your sincere love and thanks to the important father figures in your life. A small thoughtful gift along with a sweet Father’s Day Card is the traditional way of celebrating this special occasion.

Friendship Thank You Card
Truly good friends are hard to come by. It’s important to water your friendships so they continue to grow and flower into wonderful life-long relationships. Every now and then it’s nice to acknowledge those important people in your life with a sweet greeting card expressing your gratitude for their friendship.

Funeral Thank You Notes
These thank you card entries were lovingly written to help you express your thanks for help, kindness, flowers, gifts, cards, pre-made food, phone calls and more. My sincere condolences for your very private loss.

Get Well Thank You Message
So many friends, neighbors, co-workers and family members sent you their well wishes, thoughts and prayers during your time of illness. Thank these wonderful people by mailing each a lovely thank you card with a personal message.

Graduation Thank You Card Wording
Congratulations to the graduate! You’ve accomplished so much. It was so wonderful to have friends and family attend your ceremony and festivities. And you received several lovely gifts, flowers and grad cards. Send a handwritten thank you note to each of these special individuals.

Hospitality Thank You Messages
After a wonderful dinner, visit or evening at a friend or client’s home it’s proper etiquette to send a thank you card with a thoughtful message. An email thanks is completely acceptable for those persons with whom you have very casual relationships.

House Sitting Thank You Card Message
This page has plenty of wonderful thank you note wording inspiration for thanking the person(s) who took great care of your home while you were away.

House Warming Thank You Cards
How exciting to move into a new home! This is the beginning of a new and special chapter in your life. Thank your party guests for their cards, visits and gifts with these sweet messages of thanks.

Job Interview Thank You Letters
This section is packed with professionally-worded thank you letter examples for job interview thanks. Your letter can be emailed or handwritten on a nice thank you card and snail mailed.

Money Gifts or Cash Gift Thanks
What a wonderful happy feeling it is to receive a thoughtful gift of money. Show your thanks for checks, gift certificates, and cash gifts with a nice thank you note with a personalized message of sincere thanks.

Mother’s Day Thank You Card Message
Celebrate this special day by spending it with your beautiful mom. Bring her flowers and/or a gift along with a loving Mother’s Day Card filled with sweet phrases and a message of thanks.

Pet Sitting Thank You Card Wording Examples
Your animals were so well taken care of when you were away. It gave you a measure of peace knowing that your beloved little ones were in good hands during your absence. Remember to thank your pet sitter by sending him/her a thoughtful thank you card expressing your thanks.

Scholarship Thank You Letter Examples
When you receive a scholarship it’s important to thank the donor or organization who generously granted you the funds to continue your education. If you’re unsure what wording to include in your thank you letter, we’ve got you covered! Browse through the scholarship thank you note wording examples in this section. Saying thank you for the scholarship has never been easier!

Teacher Thank You Note Examples
This page contains plenty of wonderful thank you card writing examples for thanking teachers and other important members of the school staff. Use the wording and phrases in this section to create one-of-a-kind thank you messages.

Valentine’s Day Thanks
Happy Valentine’s Day! This is the perfect opportunity to thank your loved ones for the love and sweetness they show you all year long. Pick up a bottle of your favorite bubbly and start getting festive. Bake a few heart-shaped cookies or pink cupcakes and let the celebration begin. Thank you cards in this section are coming soon!

Volunteer Thank You Card Words and Phrases
Thank your volunteers by sending a thoughtful, heartfelt thanks for the wonderful job they did. These tireless friends and community members deserve to have their hours of dedication recognized in a very sweet way. Here’s thank you card wording you cn use right now!

Wedding Day Thanks
Congratulations to the gorgeous new couple! After your beautiful wedding day there is a long list of guests that need to be properly thanked for their thoughtful gifts. This special page contains a delightful number of sweetly crafted thank you note wording examples to help get you started.

GIFT GUIDE FOR ALL OCCASIONS

ABOUT MORE THANK YOU NOTES

When sitting down to write thank you notes, sometimes all you need to get started is a few new ideas for wording and phrasing. These thank you note examples are designed to spark your own imagination and creativity. There are so many wonderful, special people in your life that share their time, talents and expertise helping you achieve your personal goals. Others lend a helping hand or a friendly ear and are ready to help you problem solve. Each of these friends, family members, neighbors or acquaintances deserve to be properly thanked for their kindness. This is your personal inspirational playground where you can discover new ways of communicating your gratitude and sincere thanks.


ADDITIONAL RESOURCES FOR THANK YOU NOTE WORDING

SISTER SITES: freethankyounotes.com and confettiandbliss.com
Each of these beautiful sites has original thank you card wording that was professionally written specifically with your needs in mind. Our current categories are listed below. If there’s a thank you message category that’s not covered within these three sites, please contact us and bring it to our attention. We will be happy to add the new category along with fresh, exclusive content. Each thank you card section is refreshed throughout the year with brand new entries. We want this to be your personal collection of thank you note wording and phrases for all of life’s important moments. Remember to bookmark this site. Enjoy!

Email etiquette is a common struggle for students. It's important to nail down, though, because the professors on the other end of your emails are etiquette professionals. And while that's a little more than intimidating, it also means that we can go directly to the source—real-life professors!—to learn how to email a professor.

The professors we contacted gave comprehensive responses full of wonderful and thoughtful feedback that will help students write better emails. Many themes recurred, and it was often easy to tell that the professors had strong feelings about certain etiquette matters.

From tips on salutations to content and everything in between, these professors have provided advice to help you with emailing your professors based on real-life scenarios.

They've seen the worst of your emails; they've seen the best of your emails. So what's the takeaway?

1. Have a firm grasp of the English language

It's important to be self-aware when you're composing an email. If you have a firm grasp of the English language, you should be able to write a grammatically correct email in which everything is spelled appropriately, the word choice is academic, and the tone is appropriate.

However, the English language is tricky, and nailing down the minute details can be difficult. If you struggle with grammar or tend to overlook errors, it will be difficult to communicate professionally with your professor. As such, you may wish to have your writing proofread to ensure that your email is completely error-free.

Dr. Brandon Gilroyed, an anaerobic digestion and biofuel research assistant professor at the University of Guelph Ridgetown Campus, notes the importance of proper spelling and grammar when emailing a professor: "I have seen plenty of emails written entirely in lowercase and without any punctuation, likely because the message was written on a smartphone."

While writing on your phone might be more convenient, Dr. Gilroyed states that it still denotes poor etiquette. "It is difficult to take the sender of a message riddled with spelling and grammatical errors seriously," he says.

Having a firm grasp of the English language doesn't end with spelling and capitalization. Clarity in the content of your email is vital if you want your professor to respond positively. If an email isn't well written, it can be difficult to understand its content.

Dr. Ted Vokes, an adjunct faculty member in the Department of Psychology at the University of Windsor, has taught more than 100 courses, between the Department of Psychology and the Odette School of Business. So he understands the difference between a well-written and poorly written email. He says, "If it's worth sending the email, it's worth reading over before one sends it. I really want to help students, but if I can't understand the question, I am at a loss as to how to help."

2. Look over your email address

Here's another tip where self-awareness is key. Email using your student email address, if you have one. If you don't or you can't use it for some reason, be very conscious about what your private email address is communicating to your professor. I had to change the email address here for privacy reasons, but I can tell you that Dr. M.J. Toswell, a professor in the Department of English at Western University, noted that she once received an email sent from an account as unprofessional as "[email protected]," which is her "best example of a bad email account." Agreed!

Clearly, an email address like this doesn't send a professional message to your professor, and etiquette is all about professionalism. However, there's an even bigger problem with using private email accounts: spam filters. Dr. Toswell recounts:

My all-time favorite was a sequence from last year, on a Friday evening. The first email at 8 p.m. asked me whether an assignment was really due online on Monday night. The second email at 9 p.m. asked why I hadn't answered the first email yet. Both were addressed "Hey" and sent from a private email address that landed in my spam so I didn't see them until Saturday morning, and nearly deleted them because the subject line was blank too.

So the best-case scenario is that you lose that much-needed professionalism, and the worst-case scenario is that your email winds up unread. Be very aware of the email address you use to email a professor, and carefully consider what it might be communicating.

3. Check the syllabus before you start emailing

Most of the professors noted that students often already have the information they're seeking before they send an email. Dr. Toswell emphasizes that her "biggest woes" are related to the importance of checking the information that's already available to you before you start sending emails.

She notes that students often ask where or when exams are, what content is included on exams, or even to be exempt from exams, all just hours before an exam is set to begin. Dr. Toswell says, "It's hard to explain politely that the course materials, the syllabus, and my in-class discussions have covered these issues, and they should look at the website."

Clearly, it's best not to email your professor for information that is already available, but you may not realize the information is available. Be sure to listen in class, check the course website, and refer to the syllabus before you email a professor. Dr. Manina Jones of the English and Writing Studies Department at Western University notes that a recurring theme she and her colleagues encounter is students asking questions the course syllabus can answer.

She advises, "Before shooting off that email, it can never hurt to read carefully over the syllabus to see if the information is included there." This will ensure you won't come across as inattentive or lazy to your professors, which will not give the best impression if you're asking a question or requesting a favor. Dr. Jones also hints that checking the syllabus also applies to salutations: "Often the syllabus will give the professor's preferred form of address." On that note . . .

4. Overthink the salutation

Since the salutation of an email is usually only a couple of words, it's easy to overlook. However, the salutation requires careful consideration, especially since it's the first line of your email.

First, make sure you include one! "I have to say that the lack of any salutation (launching right into 'I want . . .' or 'Where is . . .' or 'Can I . . .') . . . is the quickest way to get my back up before I even read the body of the message," Dr. Jones states. Some kind of greeting comes off as more friendly, polite, and professional.

Dr. Gilroyed notes that it's common to get emails that are too casual, beginning simply with "Hey." Dr. Jan Plug, Associate Professor and Director of the Centre for the Study of Theory and Criticism at Western University, agrees that students should avoid addressing their professors this way. He states, "Of course, all of this depends on how well the student knows the professor, but when starting a conversation, a bit too much formality might not be too much." He suggests using a simple "Dear" or "Hello" instead. "Things may get more familiar over time, but you really can't go wrong starting off in this way."

Dr. Vokes notes that a casual greeting, though, can be appropriate in some situations. Consider how well you know the professor. If you've already corresponded with this professor through email and in class, you may wish to use a more casual greeting. Dr. Vokes states, "I'm totally fine with 'Hi Dr. Vokes.' I set a casual tone in class, so I'm pleased when students feel comfortable to ask questions via email or in person in this manner."

He notes that there's a fine line, though: "What I never appreciate is something like 'Hey! Is there class tonight?' Once I even had a student send me an email which said, 'Hey, dude . . . do we have to come to class today?' (it was snowing out)." He suggests that it doesn't give the best first impression to receive an email that begins, "Hi Ted." Dr. Jones agrees: "I've often had emails starting 'Hey' or 'Yo!' or 'Dude!' This is fine for friends but not appropriate for an email to your professor."

5. Address your professor appropriately

The way you address your professor communicates something both about you and about the person you're emailing, so it needs attention. Dr. Jones notes that your email "requires a formal salutation and a recognition of the professor's professional status (and your own!)."

In addition, Dr. Plug says that "students can tend to be too familiar in their email style too quickly." You need to address your professor correctly, of course, carefully considering his or her title. If your professor has a doctorate, he or she might not want to be called "Professor." Similarly, he or she might not appreciate a "Mr." or "Mrs." and might prefer being addressed as "Professor."

It's also best to avoid gendered addresses. The female professors contacted often cited taking issue with the address of "Mrs." Dr. Jones states it is "a particularly irritating salutation because it makes assumptions about my marital status and gender role." Similarly, Dr. Toswell notes that she hates being called Mrs. Toswell so much, "it's visceral." That's definitely not the kind of reaction you want to garner from a professor!

In the same way, addresses like "Sir" can come across as unprofessional in emails to your professor. "I often get 'Sir,' which is fine, but it clearly conveys to profs that you still think you are in high school," Dr. Vokes notes.

Dr. Vokes does say, however, that he understands how addressing professors appropriately is confusing to students: "Not all professors are doctors . . . and not all doctors who teach are professors . . . . I'm sessional, but because I've been made an adjunct, both are accurate. Then, of course, senior graduate students who teach are neither, and 'Mr.' or 'Ms.' is appropriate." It's confusing, but that also means that, when you get it right, your professors will both notice and appreciate your time and effort in addressing them correctly.

6. Err on the side of being too formal

You have to think about the actual name you'll use to address your professor. Obviously, you want to spell his or her name correctly. There will be no great reward for this, but spelling a name incorrectly comes across as extremely disrespectful. Usually, a last name is included in the email address, so there's no excuse for spelling the name incorrectly in the body of the email. Dr. Vokes says, "I got 'Dr. Votes' just this morning. I understand autocorrect is likely the culprit in this case, but I get 'Bokes' and 'Voakes.'" While he notes that he's not offended in these cases in the slightest, he also notes, "It leaves the impression that this person isn't that attentive to detail."

In addition, spelling the professor's email address correctly is vital. Dr. Jones states, "Because my last name is common, I've even had emails meant for another professor altogether," so make sure you check that you have the appropriate address.

On actually using your professor's name in the email, Dr. Gilroyed notes that greeting a professor by his or her first name is fine if it's agreed upon in advance, but doing so otherwise is improper email etiquette. He says, "The first email communication between student and professor is not a good time to begin using the first name."

When in doubt, Dr. Jones notes that professors will tell you outright if they prefer to be addressed by their first name. If you're still unsure, she advises that "the more formal choice of salutation will never offend, and then you can be corrected (it's easier to say, 'Please call me Bob' than it is to say, 'Um, I'd rather you didn't call me Bob')."

Dr. Plug also notes that, after the first email, you can begin to follow the professor's lead, and Dr. Jones agrees. In my original email to Dr. Jones, I addressed her as "Dr. Jones," safely choosing a more formal address. After she signed off as "Manina" in her reply, it was safe to assume I could henceforth address her as "Manina," which I did in my subsequent emails. She took note of this in returning tips to me, so it actually works! Reading signs carefully will help you to choose the correct address.

7. Provide enough background information

When emailing professors, you have to remember that they receive tons of emails every day. These emails come from different students in different classes, sometimes in different faculties, or even from different campuses.

When you email your professor and don't identify yourself properly, your professor might have trouble placing you. Being remembered when you're just one student in a huge class is an even greater concern if you have a common name. Dr. Gilroyed notes that "in larger classes, there might be three students named Matthew or five students named Jessica."

Dr. Jones similarly states that she sometimes teaches many big classes in the same semester and that knowing the name of every student is difficult. That doesn't even include problems across different classes or sections! So it's imperative that you place yourself exactly and fully. Including your first and last name, class, class time and day, and section number will help a professor to place you correctly. Dr. Jones notes that you can also provide context in terms of continuing a previous conversation or building on a topic you've already discussed in person.

In addition, you have to provide background information in terms of the actual topic at hand. Dr. Gilroyed says, "Students often write emails in which they immediately focus on a very specific topic or detail without providing any context or preamble. While the content of the message may be perfectly clear to the student, a professor who has dozens or hundreds of students may need more information to understand the scope of the student's query." He also notes that fully explaining a situation is "better than assuming your professor will know or remember every detail immediately."

8. Note the difference between being casual and being careless

If you've already emailed and spoken to your professor and have established a more casual correspondence, your messages might read awkwardly if they're too formal. Professors encourage being casual in this case. However, it's vital to note the difference between being casual and being careless.

You should never resort to texting language. Obviously, it's unprofessional. Dr. Gilroyed notes, "Use of this kind of language communicates to me that a student doesn't wish to spend the time to construct a proper message, yet they will often want me to spend my time reading the message and then doing something for them."

Similarly, Dr. Jones says that it's inappropriate to use short forms and emoticons. This also means the difference between correctly written English and emails riddled with typos. Dr. Vokes comments that, after a respectful salutation, "clear and respectfully written information in the body of the email needs to follow." There's a difference between a casually written message and an incorrect and careless one.

There's also a difference between being casual and being careless in terms of content. Your professor does not want to know too much information; even if he or she is friendly with you, some talk should be reserved for friends only. For example, Dr. Jones notes that she receives emails from students offering excuses for missing class that simply give too much information. "I don't need to know that a student's friends threw him a birthday party and he's hung over and wants to write a make-up test, or that she's decided to take a long weekend, or was stuck in traffic," she says.

9. Don't ask the dreaded question

Though this tip isn't directly related to email etiquette, it's been included because it was mentioned by multiple professors without prompting and it does concern the content of your email. Several professors noted a certain question they're commonly asked that drives them absolutely nuts. Students who miss class will often ask, "Did I miss anything in class on Monday?" Dr. Plug says, "I always want to say, 'No, we did absolutely nothing, as usual.'"

Dr. Jones notes that the same question is "the great bane of all professors." She offers this poem that tackles the subject. Why is it such a terrible question, though, and what makes it so inappropriate? Professor Jones offers an answer:

First, it's insulting to imply that the content of any class might not have been important, or that it can be recapped in a short email—and second, it's not the professor's responsibility to offer multiple iterations of the class. If you miss a class without a legitimate reason, it's your responsibility to arrange for access to notes from another student and/or find out what was covered.

Clearly, it's best to avoid this question!

10. Acknowledge your gratitude

Before you sign off, it's important that you include a valediction—that is, a complimentary farewell. Dr. Jones notes the importance of a valediction in proper email etiquette, even if it's just a quick statement like "Thanks for your help!" She says, "It does pay to acknowledge that if you're asking for something (even if it's just information) that your professor deserves some recognition of his/her time and trouble."

Instead of launching directly into what it is you want to request from your professor, you can acknowledge your gratitude or how busy he or she is. Doing so is a nice little way to recognize the professor's efforts in replying to your emails, and the gesture will be appreciated. Dr. Jones provides an example of an effective valediction: "Try something like 'I know you're busy, but I'm hoping you'll be able to make some time to meet and go over my answers on the quiz.'"

It might seem like a small or insignificant note, but it can definitely help your email to be received in a positive light and paint you favorably, especially amongst a slew of emails that don't include valedictions. Dr. Vokes notes, "From research, we know that first impressions very much affect a person's desire to be of assistance." If you make a good first impression, your professor will be more likely to help you, or, at the very least, they will be happier to help you.

11. Carefully consider your signoff

Your signoff is as important to consider as anything else in emailing a professor. Just like your opening salutation, it communicates something about you. You'll also be able to further set the tone of the email, be it more formal (using something like "regards") or more casual (using something like "all the best"). Offering "cheers" will not always be appropriate, so again, consider how well you know the professor you're emailing.

Dr. Gilroyed states, "Every email to a professor should adhere to the standard construct of a letter, which includes an opening salutation, the body of the message, and an appropriate signoff." That's why using an improper signoff, or no signoff at all, is bad email etiquette and should be avoided. A simple signoff is fine; try to balance being casual and professional.

You can also use your signoff to further distinguish yourself among a sea of students. Dr. Gilroyed notes that students should sign off "with an appropriate closing salutation and then a full name." Again, professors receive many emails every day. Some are without signoffs, and some use only first names. Including your full name will help your professor recognize and identify you quickly and easily.

Putting It into Practice

Okay, now that we have a list of email etiquette tips from real professors, how about putting them into practice? Here's an example of an excellent email to a professor:

An email isn't just a piece of correspondence. It's an exercise in communicating well, and you're judged by it. Using this advice from real professors about how to email a professor, you can be judged favorably. Dr. Gilroyed says, "I cannot speak for all professors, but I certainly take notice when I receive a well-constructed email from a student. It shows me that they care enough to put in the effort to compose a proper message and they respect my time."

Even better, you can use emailing a professor to your advantage by asking genuine and intellectual questions. As Dr. Toswell explains, "Don't use up what I think of as your email currency (there's only so much bandwidth in my brain for one student and her questions unless they genuinely engaged with the course material) on bad inquiries." What's more, you can use these questions to form a bond with your professors. Dr. Toswell further says, "Email in order to establish a connection, and make it a solid one." If your email follows these tips, you'll no doubt be able to establish a connection that lasts through university and beyond.

Special thanks to all the professors who shared their email etiquette tips with us for this article. Your time and insights are much appreciated!

Image source: Nosnibor137/BigStockPhoto.com

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The Value of Thank You Notes

Consider your job interview thank you letters as follow-up "sales" letters. This is an opportunity to say why you want the job, what your qualifications are, and how you would contribute to the company. Your thank you letter is also the perfect opportunity to discuss anything of importance that your interviewer didn't ask or that you didn't answer as well as you could have.

When writing other business and work-related thank you messages and letters, keep in mind that every time you say thank you, you are not just showing your appreciation - you are also reminding the person you are writing to of who you are. These letters are great relationship builders.

Here's information on when to say thank you and whom to thank, different types of professional thank you letters and when to use them. Also see sample thank you letters, thank you notes, letters of appreciation, and thank you email messages for a variety of professional, business, and employment-related circumstances.

How to Use Thank You Letter Examples and Templates

It is a good idea to read thank you examples or templates before writing your own. Examples can help you see what kind of content you should include in your message. Examples can also help you with the layout and format of your letter. Consider reading sample thank you letters and a formatted email thank you message to help you prepare your own note.

Thank you letter templates can also help with the format and structure of your letter. You can select a thank you letter template and fill it in with information related to your situation.

While examples, templates, and guidelines are a great starting point to your thank you note, you should always be flexible. Do be sure to take the time to personalize your message so it reflects your sincere appreciation and the reason why you are writing.

01

Job Interview Thank You Letters

It is important to say thank you to an employer after an interview. This is a great way to emphasize your interest in a job, remind the employer why you are an ideal candidate, and address any remaining concerns that came up in the interview. Read here for a list of sample thank you letters, and more tips on when and how to send an interview thank you letter.

02

Thank You Letters for References and Recommendations

 Always write a recommendation for people who write you letters of recommendation or provide references. This is a great way to show your appreciation for help with your job search. Here are sample thank you letters for people who provided you with references and letters of recommendation.

03

Professional Appreciation Letters

It is important to thank everyone who helps with your career, your business, or a job search. Showing appreciation for people is a great way to maintain relationships with employers, colleagues, vendors, and networking contacts. Here are sample appreciation letters to send to contacts who have provided you with assistance.

04

Business Thank You Letters

Thank you letters are important for a variety of business-related circumstances. Review business thank you letter samples for professional and employment-related scenarios, including thank you letters for employees, employers, colleagues, clients, and networking contacts.

05

Employee Thank You Letters

Sending a thank you letter to an employee is a great way to recognize someone’s hard work, boost morale, and maintain strong relationships in the office. Read here for examples of thank you letters and email messages to send to an employee who has done a good job. Also, read example thank you letters to a boss, to team members, to colleagues, and to others in the workplace whom you wish to thank for their assistance or performance.

06

Thank You Note Samples

When you need to say thank you, it is important to use both the right words and the right format. Sometimes a handwritten note is best; other times, a quick email is ideal. Here are a variety of samples of thank you emails, notes, and more.

07

Email Thank You Messages

An email thank you message is a great idea when you want to send a short note of appreciation as quickly as possible. This is particularly important after a job interview. Read here for email thank you letter examples, with a focus on emails for employment-related situations, including job interviews and more.

08

Handwritten Thank You Notes

t takes some time to write and mail a handwritten thank you note. However, many executives surveyed prefer handwritten notes to email messages. If time permits, mailing handwritten thank you cards can make a great impression.

09

Networking Letter Samples

Saying thank you after meeting or receiving help from a contact is a great way to maintain your network. Here are sample job search and career networking thank you letters including a thank you for an introduction, a thank you for a referral, and more.

10

Thank You Letter Writing Tips

Tips for writing and sending professional thank you letters, thank you notes, thank you cards, and thank you email messages, including whom you should thank, when you should say thank you, and the best way to send thank you notes and emails.

11

Sample Professional Thank You Letter

Eva White
123 Main Street
Anytown, CA 12345
555-555-5555
eva.white@email.com

September 3, 2018

Bob Smith
3 Oak Street
Anytown, CA 12345

Dear Mr. Smith,

I want to thank you for being a loyal CBI Designs customer. As one of our first clients, you helped our company get off the ground. It was a real pleasure helping you bring your vision to life in what was then your new home.

Since then, we’ve worked together on numerous home renovation and design projects, and I’m always excited when I see that you’ve emailed with ideas.

In addition, I’m grateful to you for recommending other customers. You’ve helped make my part-time hobby into a full-time job, and I can’t thank you enough.

Sincerely yours,

Eva White, CBI Designs

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From an early age, my mom instilled in me the importance of writing thank you notes. I can’t remember the exactly how old I was when I wrote my first one, but I imagine it was as soon as I was able to write. After every birthday party, Christmas, or any other occasion where someone had given me a gift, my mom wouldn’t let me rest until I’d written a thank you note to every last person.

As I’ve gotten older, I’ve continued to write thank you notes for all sorts of reasons. I’ve written them to high school teachers who wrote me letters of recommendation, to friends who let me stay with them during my travels, and to the many mentors I’ve had during my journey as a freelancer.

I’ve also had the pleasure of receiving a few thank you notes over the years, so I know just how warm and appreciated they can make you feel. At the same time, I’ve used thank you notes as part of my professional life, both out of courtesy and the desire to follow up with potential clients. They can be powerful tools, yet so few people take the time to write them.

In this post, I want to take away any excuses you might have for writing thank you notes. Don’t know how? I’ll show you. Not sure when to send a thank you note? I’ve got you covered. Struggling to structure your note? I created a three free templates.

By the end of this post, you’ll know everything you need to start sending your own thank you notes. The results will be improved professional prospects for you, as well as a world that’s just a little bit happier and more full of gratitude.

4 Reasons to Write a Thank You Note

Why write a thank you note to begin with? In some cases, the need is obvious. If you receive a birthday gift, for instance, you should write a thank you note both to show your gratitude and to let the person know you received their gift.

In other cases, however, things can be less clear. Do you send your boss a thank you note for…giving you a job? What about your who helped you during their office hours? You can’t spend all your time writing thank you notes, after all.

I don’t have the answers for every situation, but here are four common reasons you should write a thank you note. These will cover the majority of the situations you’ll encounter. If you’re in any doubt, then just send a note. It never hurts.

1. To Thank Someone for a Gift

Of all the situations in which you’d send a thank you note, this is the one people are most familiar with. If anyone sends you a gift in the mail, a thank you note is definitely the right move, especially if that person is someone you don’t see much in person. Even if it is someone you see regularly, however, it’s always a pleasure to receive mail that isn’t a credit card offer, bill, or ad.

There is one gift-giving situation where I think thank you notes are (probably) unnecessary. If you’re at some kind of organized gift exchange where it’s assumed that everyone will bring and receive a gift, then you don’t need to send a thank you note. Unless, of course, you’re the victim of a Michael Scott-level gift that goes way over the $20 limit:

2. To Follow Up After a Job Interview or Meeting

This is a type of thank you note that you’re probably not as familiar with. However, if you’ve read any of our content on job interviews, you’ll know that following up after an interview is essential. The best way to do this is through sending a thank you note. Why? Assuming two candidates are equally qualified, which one would you hire?

  • The one who reached out to you after the interview to thank you for taking the time to give them a tour of your office, answer their questions about the job, and give them a chance to grow their career
  • OR the one who came to the interview and didn’t even bother taking 5 minutes to send a thank you note

Of course, sending a thank you note won’t guarantee you get the job over someone who’s more qualified or performed better during the interview. But it never hurts.

Also, don’t limit your interview thank you notes to just the hiring manager or team that interviewed you. Depending on the interview format, it might also make sense to send a thank you note to the receptionist who escorted you to the interview room or the department head who gave you a tour.

3. To Show Your Gratitude for Someone’s Help

This is the type of thank you note that we don’t send enough. If someone helped you out, let them know. I’m not saying you need to send a written thanks to every person that ever held the door for you, but larger gestures of help definitely deserve a note.

Here are some situations where a thank you note makes sense:

  • For a letter of recommendation – Whether it was for a job, internship, graduate school, or volunteer opportunity, send a note that shows you’re thankful for the time your professor, coach, or boss took to write the letter. Not only is this the right thing to do, but it’s also a chance to update the person on whether or not you got the opportunity you applied for (and how it went).
  • For academic help – Did your professor, tutor, or friend take extra time to help you master derivatives or decline German nouns? Thank them for going above and beyond.
  • For career advice – Did someone from career planning spend hours helping you to perfect your resume? Did a local professional meet with you for coffee to tell you how they got started in their field? This kind of help is hugely valuable, so tell them how much they helped you.
  • For support during a difficult time – Was someone there for you when you were struggling with anxiety, bad grades, or the loss of a loved one? You can’t ever repay them for their help (not that you need to), but you can send them a thank you note.

4. To Demonstrate Your Appreciation

This reason is similar to the previous, but a bit more general. There are some people in our lives that always deserve thanks, since they provide us with ongoing support or, ya know, raised us. I’m talking about your parents, your close friends, or even the barista at the coffee place where you do your homework.

If there’s someone special in your life that’s helped you get where you are, supported you all the way, or just made your day a bit brighter, send some thanks their way.

How to Write a Thank You Note in 5 Steps

Now that you understand the reasons you’d want to write a thank you note, let’s take a look at how to actually do it. As with any kind of writing, getting started is usually the most difficult part. With the method below, you’ll be writing that note and sending it off in no time.

1. Identify the Reason

Why are you writing this thank you note? Your reason probably fits one of the categories I discussed above, but if not, that’s cool too. What’s most important is that you understand why, as that will dictate how you approach writing the note.

The type of thank you note you write to a professor who helped you pass Calculus is going to be different from the kind you write to a friend you’ve known since childhood.

2. Choose the Format

Once you know why you’re writing the note (and who the recipient is), you need to choose your format. By this, I mean you need to make a couple decisions:

  • Physical or digital note
  • If choosing a physical note, you also need to decide between:
    1. Typed or handwritten
    2. Pre-made or homemade card

Let’s look at each of these choices in more detail:

Physical vs. Digital Thank You Notes

If you have the option to send a physical thank you note, do it. It’s way more personal and requires more effort than a digital one.

In some cases, though, a physical thank you note may not be practical. Perhaps you don’t have a physical address for the person you want to thank (and you have no way to look it up).

Or, in a job interview situation, it may be in your best interest to send a digital thank you since a physical one might not arrive before the company has made their hiring decision.

In most cases, however, I suggest going the physical route.

Typed vs. Handwritten

Even if you decide to send a physical thank you note, you still need to decide if you want to type it or write it by hand. If you have nice, legible handwriting, then I think you should choose handwritten. If you’re like me, however, and have handwriting that friends have described as both “serial killer” and “like someone who just learned to write cursive,” then you may be better off typing a nice note and then signing it at the bottom with a pen.

Also, you should consider the occasion. If you’re sending the note in a professional context where legibility is the most important thing, then typing is better. But if you’re sending the note to a close friend or family member who won’t judge your chicken scratch, go ahead and add that charming, handwritten touch.

Premade vs. Homemade

Should you use a store-bought thank you card, or should you create your own? I think there’s a lot of room for variation here. You certainly should not buy a premade card and just sign your name. That’s almost worse than not sending a thank you note; it’s very impersonal.

But there’s nothing wrong with choosing a funny or touching thank you card from the store and then adding your own personal message.

In general, though, I’d stick with just a standard typewritten note (no weird fonts or colors) or some simple cards that have “Thank You” embossed on them.

3. Write a Draft Using This Structure

Now that you’ve chosen your format, you need to write the notes. It’s easy to get trapped in writer’s block at this stage, agonizing over the right words to use. To break you out of that paralysis, here’s a format that works for any thank you notes you’ll need to write. It consists of four parts:

  1. Salutation/greeting
  2. A kind message or thought
  3. What you’re thanking them for
  4. Conclusion (and follow-up, if relevant)

Let’s look at each in more detail:

1. Salutation/greeting

This is the first line of the note. It’s the classic “Dear So-and-so” that you use when you write an email (I was going to say “write a letter,” but then I remembered no one does that anymore).

If you’re writing a professional note, then you can just use “Dear” + “the person’s full name (and title, if relevant).” For instance, “Dear Thomas Frank.”

I don’t generally think it’s necessary to use “Mr.” or “Ms.” these days. If you’re applying for a job in an industry or at a company that’s very traditional, you might do so. Likewise, you might want to include it if the person you’re writing to is a lot older than you. You’ll have to use your best judgment there.

If it’s not a professional note, then it might make more sense to start with the person’s name followed by a comma. For example, “Martin,”. Or, you could include a greeting before it, as in “Hey Roxine,”. Use whatever sounds natural. Read it aloud if you need to.

2. A kind message or thought

This is what you should write in the first sentence or two of the note. Just as when you’re meeting someone, you wouldn’t start with the thing you’ve come to talk about.

You need to make a little small talk first to ease into the conversation. It’s the same with a note like this. Plus, saying something kind and thoughtful will make your recipient feel good.

For example, let’s say you’re writing to the hiring manager of a company where you just had an interview. You might begin with a couple sentences along the lines of “I had a lovely time touring your office the other day” or “It was a pleasure to meet you and the team members at Needful Things.”

3. What you’re thanking them for

This is the heart of the thank you note. Express whatever it is that you want to say thanks for. For example, “Thank you for taking the time to tell me about how you got started in the cat café business.” Or, “I’m so thankful for the support you gave me during my dad’s illness.”

4. Conclusion (and follow-up, if relevant)

Once you’ve thanked the recipient, you need to conclude the note. This will vary depending on the formality of the situation and your intent for the note.

If you’re just writing to thank a friend, it’s sufficient to just add one more kind/funny sentence and then just sign your name at the bottom. If you’re close to the person, you might write “Much love,” and then your name.

With a business thank you note, on the other hand, you want to add a nice conclusion but also indicate your future intent. For instance, if you’re writing to thank a professional mentor, you could say, “I’ll keep you updated on my career plans when I’m closer to graduation.” Or, “I’d love to return the favor and help you in any way I can.”

Don’t be pushy or sleazy, but don’t be afraid to take the lead in continuing or furthering the relationship you have with the person you’re writing to. They’ll appreciate you doing so, as it makes it easier for them to help you (which they presumably want to do if they’ve already met with you and you made a good impression).

This can also work well for jobs, as even if you don’t end up being the company’s pick for a specific position, you’ll at least be on their radar for future hires (or if their first-choice candidate declines their offer).

4. Edit Your Draft (To Eliminate These 5 Common Mistakes)

Okay, so you have your thank you note draft. But don’t send it just yet. Before you put in the mail (or press “Send”), you should give it an editing pass.

If you’re handwriting your note, I recommend doing a typed draft first so that you can use digital tools to check for spelling, usage, and grammar errors. Regardless, though, you should look to eliminate these five common errors:

1. Too long or wordy

You’re writing a thank you note, not a cover letter, book proposal, or research paper. Therefore, you should keep it short. Five sentences maximum is plenty, and I’d say three is adequate for most situations.

2. Impersonal

The most impersonal thing you can do is buy a pre-written thank you card and sign it. But even if you write your own card, it’s still possible that it’s impersonal. Be sure to include some touches that make it clear that you know the person you’re writing to (and aren’t just using a generic thank you note).

If you’re writing to someone you know well, this is easy. Just make an inside joke or reference whatever happened at your last family gathering.

But if you’re writing to someone in a professional context, you’ll have to get more creative. You could mention something funny that happened during the interview, or a detail that stood out to you about the company’s office.

It’s the difference between, “I loved learning about your company” and “Hearing about how Buy More is reshaping the consumer electronics buying experience gave me insight into the direction I want to take my career.”

3. Incorrect tone

“Tone” in writing can be hard to define, but it’s basically the way a piece of writing sounds. For our purposes, the most important aspect of tone is how formal (or informal) the note sounds. In a note to a friend, you should use casual words like “hey” or “badass.”

But in a note to the company you’re hoping will offer you a job, you’ll want to keep things more professional. You don’t want to sound like a robot, but you don’t want to be too casual, either.

4. Grammar errors

When writing something this short, there aren’t usually many true grammar errors to watch out for. Most of the problems you’ll encounter will involve misspelled or misused words. For example, writing “to” instead of “too” or “there” instead of “they’re.”

To avoid these issues, I recommend taking your thank you note and pasting it into Grammarly. Grammarly is a free app that will check your writing for grammar, spelling, and usage errors. I highly recommend it for proofreading your essays; I use it for all my professional writing.

5. Spelling the recipient’s name wrong

Please, please make sure to check that you’re spelling the recipient’s name correctly. Even if it was an honest mistake, spelling someone’s name wrong makes you look careless.

As Dale Carnegie put it, “a person’s name is to that person the sweetest and most important sound in any language.” Seeing your name misspelled, however, turns it into the sourest and most frustrating sound. I say this as someone with a name that people commonly misspell….

5. Send the Note ASAP

Now that your note is error-free and polished, send it as soon as you can. While thank you notes are always pleasant to receive, they make the most sense if they’re sent as close as possible to the thing for which you’re thanking the recipient. Getting a thank you note for a Christmas gift in July, for example, is just confusing.

And in a professional situation, it’s always in your best interest as a job candidate to send the thank you note ASAP so that you’re still fresh in the hiring manager’s mind. If you wait too long, they may have hired someone else.

3 Thank You Note Examples for Different Occasions

After reading the last section, you may be wondering how all of this information fits together. It’s one thing to read about how to write a thank you note, but what does it look like in practice? To show you how to translate the theory into reality, I’ve created the following three example thank you notes for these common occasions:

  1. Thanking a professional mentor for their guidance
  2. Thanking a friend for a gift
  3. Thanking a company after an interview

Feel free to adapt each example to suit your own needs. Just make sure to personalize them accordingly.

Example #1: Thanking a Professional Mentor for Their Guidance

Dear Homer Simpson,

I enjoyed meeting you the other day for coffee and donuts. It was enlightening to me as an aspiring nuclear plant safety inspector to learn what life is like for you on the job.

Thank you for all the guidance you’ve given me as I explore this career path. You’ve helped me see how I can apply what I’m learning outside the classroom, while also giving me valuable career advice. I hope we can chat again soon; it’s always a pleasure.

With gratitude,

Ransom Patterson

Example #2: Thanking a Friend for a Gift

Hey man,

Got the mug you sent me the other day. The message on it is perfect. Can’t believe you managed to find something that combines my love of rock climbing and Futurama. Hope everyone is well in Nashville. See you at the reunion.

– Ransom

Example #3: Thanking a Company After an Interview

Dear Michael Scott,

It was a delight to meet you at the Scranton branch of Dunder Mifflin earlier today. I had no idea what a wide range of industries your company serves. Now I can appreciate just how essential paper is to modern business.

Thank you for showing me around your office and answering my questions about the open receptionist position. It sounds like an engaging, rewarding job.

Regardless of the decision you make, I’m grateful for your time and consideration.

Best,

Ransom Patterson

Stay Thankful

I hope this post has shown you how to write any kind of thank you note you could ever need.

Taking the time to write thank you notes will not only help you further your career prospects, but it will also strengthen the relationships you have outside of your work. It’s a great habit to get into while you’re still a student, as it only becomes more relevant the further you get in life.

Thanks for reading; I’m very grateful.

Image Credits: featured, typing at the table, typing with coffee mug

This guide provides insights on how to write a professional thank you letter. You thank you note should always begin with a greeting. the aspect of friendship in the letter and its effect is that the recipient will know that you think about them There is no better way to do it than just a simple short and sweet thank you note.

What to Write in a Thank You Card – Thank You Messages for Every Occasion!

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How to Email a Professor

Making a Good First ImpressionCreating the Content of the EmailFinishing Up Your EmailSample Academic EmailsSample Personal EmailsShow 2 more...Show less...Article SummaryQuestions & AnswersRelated Articles

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Writing an email to a professor takes a bit more thought than shooting an email to a friend or sending a text. Your education is the beginning of your professional career, and you should treat any interactions you have in a professional manner, including emailing. For instance, you should always use your academic account and open your email with a formal greeting. Treat the interaction as you would a formal business letter. Be concise, and remember, grammar counts!

Steps

Part 1

Making a Good First Impression

  1. 1

    Check the syllabus for the answer first. Often, the question you would like to ask has already been answered in the material the professor has provided at the beginning of class. Asking a professor to go over this again makes you look like you are not a serious student, and it frustrates the professor because it wastes their time.[1]
    • Your syllabus may contain information about course assignments, deadlines, class policies, and assignment formatting.
    • If your professor only gives you a list of readings, it's fine to email them with a question that isn't answered in the syllabus.
  2. 2

    Use your academic account. Professors are deluged with emails every day. By using your school account, you'll have a better chance of avoiding the spam filter. Plus, your school email looks more professional. It also lets the professor know who's actually sending the email, as school emails are usually based on your name.[2]

  3. 3

    Include a strong subject line. A subject line clues your professor in to what the email is about before they open it. That can be helpful because they can set aside an appropriate amount of time to deal with it. Make sure the subject line is clear and to the point.[3]
    • For instance, you could write "Question about Current Assignment" or "Final Essay."
  4. 4

    Start with a greeting using the professor's title and surname. It can be tempting to just to plunge into your request. However, when you're writing to a professor, you need to treat it more like you would a formal letter. Begin with "Dear Dr. Jones," followed by a comma. Make sure to use the professor's last name.[4]
    • If you're not sure if the professor has a doctorate, you can address them as "Professor Jones."
    • You can use a bit more informal greeting, such as "Hello Dr. Jones," if you've had personal interactions with the professor.

Part 2

Creating the Content of the Email

  1. 1

    Remind the professor who you are. Professors have many students to keep track of, and they'll need to be reminded of who you are. Say your name, as well as the class you have with the professor, including the specific class period, such as "MWF at noon."[5]

  2. 2

    Stick to the point. Professors are busy people, so you don't want to drag out your email. Say what you need to say as briefly as possible, leaving out any extraneous details.
    • For instance, if you have a question about an assignment, get to the point: "I have a question about the assignment you gave us last Tuesday. Do you want us to work in groups or alone?"
  3. 3

    Write in complete sentences. This email is not a Facebook post or a text to a friend. That means you need to use complete sentences when writing to your professor, as anything less does not look professional.[6]
    • For instance, don't write, "Awesome class, man... stellar!"
    • Instead, write, "You gave an enlightening lecture last class."
  4. 4

    Work on tone. When you're first contacting a professor, keep your tone and language very professional. That means no emojis! If you develop a correspondence with your professor, you may find that you can get a bit more relaxed as the semester goes on. That's particularly true if your professor initiates a bit of informality (such as by sending an emoji in an email to you).

  5. 5

    Make requests politely. Many students try to demand things from their professors. That will get you nowhere. Instead, phrase your issue as a request that the professor can grant or not.[7]
    • For instance, you may want the professor to give you an extension on a paper. Don't say, "My grandmother died. Give me an extension on this paper." Rather, say, "I've had a difficult week with the death of my grandmother. Would you please give me an extension on this paper?"
  6. 6

    Use proper punctuation. In an email to a friend, it may be fine to skip over periods and commas. However, when you're writing to your professor, make sure you are using punctuation where you should.[8]

  7. 7

    Spell out words. As much as text language is taking over the internet, professional emails are one place where you should leave it behind. That is, don't use "u" in place of "you," or "2morrow" in place of "tomorrow." Use proper spellings.[9]
    • Don't forget to run your email through spellcheck.
  8. 8

    Capitalize words appropriately. Words at the beginning of sentences should be capitalized, as should proper nouns. Don't slip into text speak where you selectively capitalize words. Make sure you are always capitalizing words that need to be capitalized.

Part 3

Finishing Up Your Email

  1. 1

    Specify what action you want the professor to take. Make sure you've said exactly what you want from the professor at or near the end of the email. For instance, if you want a reply, let the professor know. If you need to meet with them, make that known as well.[10]

  2. 2

    Read over your email for grammar. Go through your email to check for any grammar mistakes. Most of the time, you'll catch a mistake or two you made that you need to correct.[11]

  3. 3

    Look the email over from your professor's perspective. Think about the content of the email to make sure you aren't demanding something. Also, make sure it's really as concise as it can be. You don't want to overshare about your personal life, as that's not professional.[12]

  4. 4

    End the email with a salutation. Just like you began the letter formally, you need to end it formally as well. Use a word like "Sincerely" or "Best," followed by a comma and your full name.[13]

  5. 5

    Check back again in a week. Once you've sent the email, you don't want to pester your professor for an answer. However, if you haven't heard back in a week, you can try again, as your email may have been lost in the shuffle.[14]

  6. 6

    Acknowledge a reply. Once you receive a reply, make sure you acknowledge that you received it. A simple "Thank you" may be enough. If necessary, write a more extensive email using these same guidelines to keep it professional. If your problem or question is not being adequately resolved by email, ask for an appointment to meet in person.
    • For instance, you could say, "Thank you for addressing my question. I'll see you in class."
    • If you'd like to meet, you could write, "I appreciate your thoughts on this issue. Would you mind if we met in person to discuss it in more detail?"

Community Q&A

Add New Question
  • Question

    How do I email a professor if I won't be able to attend class because I am sick?

    Send the email in advance of class. Here's an example of an email you could send with your own details filled in: "Dear Professor Smith, This is Steve Jones from your Communications 101 class that meets at 9am. I will not be in class Thursday, September 1st due to an illness. Sincerely, Steve."

  • Question

    How should I ask a professor for an appointment?

    Ask the professor politely when he/she is available for an appointment.

  • Question

    How do I write an email to my school principal asking to send my high school transcript to various universities where I am interested in applying?

    Go to your high school's guidance office instead, and tell them you want your transcripts sent to schools. They will usually have forms for you to fill out detailing the contact information for the schools you wish to apply to, and then they will take care of the rest.

  • Question

    How do I ask for extra credit work?

    Don't. Just ask how you can improve your grade, and imply you'd be willing to do anything to improve it. If a professor doesn't offer extra credit, don't ask for it.

  • Question

    How can I ask for an appointment to meet with my professor?

    You may ask for an appointment with your professor by emailing him/her, or waiting until after class to make the appointment.

  • Question

    How do I email my professor about an assignment question?

    Very simply. For example: "Hello [whatever you call him], I was wondering if you could clarify something for me. [write your question/explain the problem]. Thanks, [your name]

  • Question

    How do I e-mail a teacher about wanting to get a good grade?

    You could ask for any tips about making your work better, or ask how much work you should do.

  • Question

    How do I reply to a professor confirming an appointment?

    Thank the professor and repeat the time of the appointment. "Thank you, Professor, I'll see you (day) (time) (place)."

  • Question

    How do I email my professor about a grade?

    In the email, ask what you can do to improve your grade.

  • Question

    How do I email my professor my class schedule in a concise manner?

    "Dear Professor [their name], I am writing in response to your request for my class schedule. I am including it below. Please let me know if you require any more information from me." Then write in your schedule, and end with "Sincerely" or "Best" followed by your name. If the professor is doing you a favor or kindness, put a "Thank you" in there somewhere.

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Tips

  • Contact a peer first if the purpose of your email is to find out what you missed when absent.

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