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Thanks in every language

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Thanks in every language
April 27, 2019 Holiday Thanks 2 comments

Он мог бы теперь жить вечно, если бы пожелал. А овладев телепатией, он подчинил себе самую неуловимую силу из. Он был готов снова, опираясь уже на собственные завоевания, ринуться к звездам -- туда, в непомерные просторы Галактики. Он хотел встретить, как равных, обитателей тех миров, от которых когда-то отвернулся в уязвленном самолюбии. Он хотел сыграть и свою роль в истории Вселенной.

И все это он исполнил.

Whenever Bob and I travel to a non-English speaking city, we try to interact with locals using their language (even if we butcher it sometimes). The effort seems to go a long way in showing respect and befriending a stranger. I can’t tell you how many times we’ve ekk’ed out merci or gracias and been given a helpful smile (or directions and advice) from a local. Committing to a basic understanding of a foreign language is a great, FREE, travel tool to have up your sleeve.

How-To Say Thank You in 14 Different Languages:

English– Thank you, Thanks

Spanish– Gracias

French– Merci  (Thank you very much= Merci Beaucoup)

Italian– Grazie

Japanese– (Domo) Arigato (ah-ree-gah’-toh) or written ありがとう

Chinese– do jeh, daw-dyeh

German– Danke sehr

Thai– Khop Khun Mak Kha

Russian– Spasiba (spah-see’-boh)

Korean– written 감사합니다 gamsahabnida

Icelandic– Takk

Hawaiian– Mahalo

Hebrew– Toda (toh-dah’)

Greek– Efharisto (ef-har-ris-tou’)

Is there a special way to say thank you where you are from? When we were in Australia, everyone would say No Worries or Easy As whenever we would thank them. In my hometown of St. Augustine, you are likely to hear a few, Thanks, y’all, coming from the locals. Have any favorites that should be added to the list? Let us know in the comments below!

 

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(*image via WoodleyWonderworks)

Whenever Bob and I travel to a non-English speaking city, we try to interact with locals using their language (even if we butcher it sometimes). The effort seems.

I spent an incredible week on a Mediterranean cruise. We visited Spain, France and Italy. Everywhere we went, I tried to know a few words in the native language. Especially thank you – gracias, merci, grazie. It was important for me to recognize the people who were serving me – from clerks at stores and wait staff at restaurants to tour guides and drivers. Everyone appreciates being appreciated.

 

It is one thing to say thank you in a person’s native tongue. It is another to speak their “appreciation language.” In the book The Five Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace, Gary Chapman and Paul White share how appreciation is best expressed in business. The basic concept is that as individuals, we each have a preferred way of receiving appreciation. When someone uses that method, we feel appreciated. When someone expresses their appreciation in another way, we may not recognize it. According to their work, there are five different ways to express appreciation.

Physical Touch

Physical touch can be expressed in many ways: a handshake, a high-five, a pat on the back, or a hug. In the context of personal relationships, this is very important to some people. Chapman found that most people don’t desire physical touch as a form of recognition in a business setting. They preferred one of the other languages of appreciation. But humans need physical touch, so don’t be afraid to use it appropriately in your business relationships.

Receiving Gifts

Some people feel appreciated when they receive a thoughtful gift. It is a great way to show appreciation to your clients. If you are going to send a gift that will make an impression, it needs to be relevant to your client’s interests. A meaningful gift shows that you took the time to know your client and understand what that person would want to receive.

Words of Affirmation

The words “thank you” can be powerful. Some people need to hear or see the words along with why you appreciate them. We don’t say “thanks” or give compliments often enough. Sometimes our clients need to hear it. Send a note in the mail. Call and thank them on the phone. Give a sincere compliment. Thank them for their business.

Quality Time

In our busy world, some people just want to spend a little time with you. When you meet with clients on the phone or in person, give them your undivided attention. Ask about their personal lives, not just business. Do they have plans for the weekend? Are they planning a vacation? How are the kids? Take the time to get to know each client as a person.Consider taking them out to lunch—not a business lunch, just for fun. Take them to sporting or cultural events. Host a client appreciation event where you can spend time with all your clients in an informal, nonbusiness setting.

Acts of Service

Some people really feel appreciated when others serve them. Acts of service say, “You are important enough to me that I want to help you.” In your business relationships, you can do this by going above and beyond in the work clients have hired you to do. Give them free advice or do something that comes easy for you from your area of expertise, but may be a struggle for them. Provide clients with templates, forms, or instructions that will simplify their lives. When you see a need that you can help with, offer to do it for them.

 

Because you may not know how your clients prefer to be appreciated, incorporate all of these things into the way you do business. Shake their hands, tell them you appreciate them, spend time with them, send a gift, and go above and beyond. When all of these things happen in your business, your clients will feel appreciated by you. When you do that, they trust your ability to deliver and they will remain a loyal client.

 

(A portion of this blog is an excerpt from the book, Lifelong Loyal Clients by Deb Brown.)

12 of the Most Important Phrases to Know in Every Language

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Thank you in many languages

Jump to phrases

How to express your thanks in numerous different languages, and how to reply when someone thanks you. In some cultures, particularly English-speaking ones, people tend to say thank you more than in other cultures. In China, for example, people rarely say thank you to their family and close friends.

To hear recordings of the phrases please click on the ones that are links, or to see more phrases in each language please click on the language names.

Key to abbreviations: (v)inf = (very) informal, (v)frm = (very) formal, sg = said to one person, pl = said to more than one person.

Click on any of the phrases that are links to hear them spoken. If you can provide recordings, corrections or additional translations, please contact me.

To see more phrases in each language click on the language names. If you'd like to see these phrases in any combination of two languages, try the Phrase Finder.

LanguageThank youReply to 'Thank you'
AbenakiWiliwni 
AbkhazИҭабуп (It̢abup) 
AdygheТхьауегъэпсэу (sg)
Тхьашъуегъэпсэу (pl)
Тхьаегъэпсэу (>m/f)
Тхьаегъэпсэух (>pl)
AfrikaansDankie
Baie dankie
Dis 'n plesier
AinuHioy'oy
Iyayiraykere
 
AlabamaAlíila 
Albanian (Gheg)Falimin-nerit
Shum faliminerit
S'kä përse
Albanian (Tosk)Falemenderit
Shumë falemenderit
S'ka përse
AleutQaĝaasakung 
AltayБыйан болзын (Bıjan bolzın)Јаантайын баштаныгар (Ĵaantajın baštanıgar)
AklanSaeamat
Saeamat gid
Saeamat nga abu
Abu'ng saeamat
Saeamat kimo
Owa it ano man
Indi mo eon pagmitla-ngon
AlsatianMersi
Vielmohls mersi
'S esch nitt de Wart
'S esch (schon) güet
Amharicአመሰግናለሁ
(amäsäggänallähw) - I praise you
በጣም አመሰግናለሁን
(bäṭam amäsäggänallähun)
ምንም አይደለም
(mənəm aydälläm) - it is nothing
ችግር የለም
(čəggər yälläm) - there is no problem
ApacheAshagoteh (inf)
Aheeihyeh (frm)
 
Arabic
(Egyptian)
(shukrān) ﺷﻜﺮﺍﹰ
(mut shakkrān) متشكّرين
(shukrān gazēlan) ﺷﻜﺮﺍﹰ جزيلاً
('afwan) عفواً
Arabic
(Lebanese)
ChokranTekram
Arabic
(Modern Standard)
(shukran) شكرا
(shukran jazīlan) شكرا جزيل
(al'afw) ألعفو
Arabic
(Moroccan)
(shukran) ﺷﻜﺮﺍ
(shukran bezzef) شكرا بزاف
(bla zhmīl) بلا جميل
(la shukran ʿla wazhb) لا شكرا علي واجب
(barak llāhū fīk) بارك الله في
AragoneseGraciasDe res
AramaicYishar
Ṯebu laḵ (>m)
Ṯebu leḵ (->f)
 
ArapahoHohóu 
Armenian
(Eastern)
մերսի (Mersi)
շնորհակալություն (Shnorhakalutyun) vfrm
խնդրեմ (Khndrem)
չարժե (Chʻarzhe)
Ոչինչ է (Vochinch e)
Armenian
(Western)
Մերսի: (Mersee)
Շնորհակալ եմ:
(Shnorhagal em) frm
խնդրեմ (Khndrem)
չարժե (Chʻarzhe)
Ոչինչ է (Vochinch e)
AromanianHaristo
Haristo multu
 
Assameseধন্যবাদ (dhônyôbad)[silence/smile]
একো নহয় (ekû nôhôy)
AsturianGracies
Munches gracies
De nada
AtikamekwMikwetc 
AymaraJuspajaraña
Juspajarkätam
Yuspagara
 
AzerbaijaniTəşəkkür edirəm
Çox sağ ol
Çox sağ olun (pl)
Buyurun
Dəyməz
BambaraI ni ce (sg)
Aw ni ce (pl)
I ni baraji (sg)
Aw ni baraji (pl)
Basi tε (No problem)
Nba
BalineseSuksema (inf)
Suksma
Matur suksema (frm)
Mawali
Suksema mawali
Bashkirрәхмәт
(räxmät)
 
BasqueEskerrik asko
Mila esker
Esker aunitz
Ez da ezer
Batak (Toba)Mauliate 
BavarianDang šee
'Geid's god (frm)
Measse (inf)
Bassd šo
Seng s' god (frm)
BelarusianДзякуй (Dziakuj)
Дзякую вам (Dziakuju vam)
Шчыры дзякуй (Ščyry dziakuj)
Няма за што (Niama za što)
BembaTsikomo
Natolela sana
Tatotela sana
Eya mukwai
Awe, cilifye, mukwai
Bengaliধন্যবাদ (Dhônyôbad)তোমাকে স্বাগত জানাই
(Tomake shagôtô janai)
Bhojpuriधन्वाद (dhanvaad)कोई ना (koi naa)
BikolSalamat
Salamat na marhay
Dyos mábalos
Daing ano man
BislamaTangkyu
Tangkyu tumas
I stret (nomo)
I oraet (nomo) I gud (nomo)
Welkam
Blackfootᖹᒧᐧᖹᖱᔪᒣᖽ (nitsíniiyi'taki) 
BosnianHvala
Hvala lijepa
Nema na čemu!
BretonTrugarez
Trugarez vras
Netra
Mann bet
BulgarianБлагодаря (Blagodarja)
Мерси (Mersi) inf
Благодаря ти (Blagodarja ti) - sg/inf
Благодаря ви (Blagodarja vi) - pl/frm
Благодаря ви много (Blagodarja vi mnogo)
Много благодаря (Mnogo blagodarja)
Много Ви благодаря (Mnogo vi blagodarja)
Добре дошъл (Dobre došãl)
Няма защо (Njama zašto)
Моля (Molja)
Burmeseေက်းဇူးတန္ပါတယ္။ (cè-zù tin-ba-deh)ရပါတယ်။ (ya-ba-deh)
Cape Verdean CreoleObrigaduDi nada
Es é ka nada
CatalanGràcies
Moltes gràcies
Mercès
De res
CebuanoSalamat
Salamat kaayo
Ok ra to oy
Wala ra to oy
Walay sapayan
Central DusunPounsikou
Kotoluadan
Miagal
Miagal nopo
Chabacano de CaviteGraciasDe nada
Nuay aquel
Chabacano de ZamboangaGraciasDe nada
No hay de que
Chamorro
(Guam dialect)
Si Yu'us Må'åse' (God have mercy)Buen probechu
Chamorro
(North Marianas dialect)
Si Yu’us ma’ase (God have mercy)Buen prubechu
ChechenБаркалла (Barkalla)Массара (Massara)
CherokeeᏩᏙ (Wado)ᎬᎵᎡᎵᎦ (Gvlieliga)
CheyenneNéá'eše 
ChichewaZikomo
Zikomo kwambiri
 
Chinese
(Cantonese)
多謝 (dòjeh) - for something given
唔該 (m̀hgòi) - for a service
唔駛 (m̀hsái)
唔駛客氣 (m̀hsái haakhei)
冇問題 (móuh mahntàih)
Chinese
(Hakka)
多謝 (do1sia5)
感謝 (gam3sia5)
唔駛客氣 (m1sii3 hak7hi5)
Chinese
(Mandarin)
謝謝 [谢谢] (xièxie)
感謝你 [感谢你] (gǎnxiè nǐ)
非常感謝你 (fēicháng gǎnxiè nǐ)
不客氣 [不客气] (bú kèqi)
不用謝 [不用谢] (bú yòng xiè)
沒關係 [没关系] (méi guānxi)
沒問題 [没问题] (méi wèntí)
Chinese
(Shanghainese)
谢谢 (yáyà)
谢谢侬 (yáyà nóng)
弗用客气 (fé yōng kēqì)
勿要谢 (viō jia)
没关系 (mak5 gue3 xi1)
勿要客气 (viō kēqì)
没事体俄 (meq zyhthih req)
覅客气 (viō kēqì)
覅谢得个 (viō-jā teqreq)
霞霞侬 (xiá yà nóng)
Chinese
(Taiwanese)
多謝 (to-siā)
感謝 (kám-siā)
撈力 (ló làt)
免客氣 (bián kheh-khì)
熟似 (se̍k-sāi)
Chinese
(Teochew)
多謝 (joi7 sia7)
感謝 (gam2 sia7)
免客气 (miang6 ket8-ki3)
勿客气 (mai5 ket8-ki3)
ChipewyanMársi
Marsi tchógh
Dégharé marsi nénesdhen
Sughuá hásįlá
ChoctawChi̱ yakōkilih chi̱toh (frm)
Yakokih (inf)
Yakoke
Ome
ChuukeseKinisou
Kinisou chapur
Kote pwan affani
ChuvashТав! (Tav!)
Пысӑк тав! (Pysăk tav!) - inf
Пысӑк тав сана! (Pysăk tav sana!) - frm
 
CimbrianVorbàis Gott!
Vorbàis Gott viil!
 
Coastal KadazanKotohuadanMiagal
Miagal nopo
ComancheɄra
Ʉrako
 
CornishMeur rasHeb grev (no problem)
Wolkomm os ta
CorsicanÀ ringraziavvi
Vi ringraziu
Di nunda
Creeᐊᕀᐦᐊᕀ (Ayhay)
ᑭᓇᓈᐢᑯᒥᑎᐣ (Kinanâskomitin)
ᒦᒃᐌᒡ (Mîkwêc)
 
CroatianHvala
Hvala lijepa
Nema na čemu
CrowAhóoh 
CuyononSalamat
Matamang Salamat
Ara anoman
Ara sapayan
Ara dato
Ara dan
CzechDík (inf)
Díky (inf)
Dĕkuju (inf)
Dĕkuju pĕknĕ (inf)
Dĕkuji (frm)
Dĕkuji vám (frm)
Dĕkuji pĕknĕ (frm)
Dĕkuji vám mnohokrát
Mockrát dĕkuji (frm)
Děkuji nastotisíckrát (frm)
Prosím, nemáte zač
Není zač
Rádo se stalo
DanishTak
Mange tak
Tusind tak (thousand thanks)
Tak for ... (thanks for ...)
Det var så lidt
Ingen årsag
Dari(Tašakor) تشكرقابل تشکرنيست
(Qâbele tašakor nest)
Maldivian(Shukuriyyaa) ޝުކުރިއްޔާ(Maruhabaa) މަރުޙަބާ
DinkaYin aca leec 
DutchDank u
Dank u wel (frm)
Bedankt
Dank je wel (inf)
Dank u zeer (thank you very much)
Duizendmaal dank (thousand times thanks)
Graag gedaan
Geen dank
Alstublieft
Alsjeblieft
DzongkhaKadrin chhe la
Namey samey kadrin chhe la
Jembalaekso
EfikSọsọñọ
Sọsọñọ eti eti
Ọfọn o
ElfdalianTjär tokk fer!Eð war so liteð
English (British)Thank you
Thank you very much
Thanks a lot (inf)
Thanks (inf)
Ta (inf)
Cheers (inf)
You're welcome
You're very welcome
Don't mention it
No problem
No worries
EstonianTänan
Tänan teid
Tänan teid väga
Aitäh
Suur aitäh
Pole tänu väärt
Võta heaks
EweAkpeWoezo
Mia woezo
Akpe melio
Mesu akpe o
ExtremaduranGracias
Muchas gracias
Muchas vezis

No es ná
Pa essu estamus
FaroeseTakk
Takk fyri
Tað var so lítið
FijianVinaka
Vinaka vaka levu
 
FinnishKiitos
Kiitoksia oikein paljon
Eipä kestä
Eipä kestä kiittää
Flemish (West)Merci 
FrenchMerci
Merci beaucoup
De rien
Il n'y a pas de quoi
Je vous en prie
Avec plaisir
À votre service
Frisian (North)Foole tunk
Frisian (Saterland)TonkjeGraach dien
Frisian (West)Tankewol
Tankje
Tankje wol
Tige tank
Gjin probleem
Nimme net kwea ôf
FriulianGraciisDi bant
Di nuie
GalicianGrazas
Graciñas
Moitas grazas
De nada
Non hai de que
GaroMitelaAiao!
Mamungba ong'ja na'a!
GasconMerciBrigue
Georgianგმადლობთ (gmadlobt)
დიდი მადლობა (didi madloba)
არაფერს (arapers)
GermanDanke
Danke schön
Vielen Dank
Tausend Dank
Danke vielmals
Recht schönen Dank
Ich danke dir
Ich danke Ihnen
Ich bin sehr dankbar für...
Ich bin dir sehr dankbar für...
Ich bin Ihnen sehr dankbar für...
Mit tiefer Dankbarkeit
Bitte
Bitte schön
Bitte sehr
Nichts zu danken
Greek (Ancient)Ἐπαινῶ (Epainō)Οὐδὲν διαφέρει (Oudén diaférei)
Greek (Modern)Ευχαριστώ (Efharistó )
Ευχαριστώ πολύ (Efharistó polí)
Παρακαλώ (Parakaló)
GreenlandicQujan
Qujanaq
Qujanarsuaq
Illillu (sg)
Ilisillu (pl)
GuaraníAguyje
Aguyjevete ndéve
Tereiko porãke
Gujaratiધન્યવાદ (dhanyavaad)
આભાર (aabhar)
તમારું સ્વાગત છ
(tamaarūṃ svaagata cha)
HaidaHáw'aa 
Haitian CreoleMesi
Mesi ampil
Merite
Padekwa
De ryen
HausaNa godeBa kome
HawaiianMahalo
Mahalo nui
Mahalo iā ʻoe
Mahalo nui loa
ʻAʻole pilikia (No problem)
Noʻu ka hauʻoli (The pleasure is mine)
Hebrew(Toda rabah) תודה רבה
(Rav todot) רב תודות
(Toda) תודה
(Bevakasha) בבקשה
HereroOkuhepa
Ndangi
Okuhepa
Ndangi
HiligaynonSalamatWala sang anuman
HindiThanks (inf)
धन्यवाद (dhanyavād) - frm
आभारी हुँ (ābhārī hōṅ) - frm
मेरा सौभाग्य है (merā subhāgya hai)
कोई बात नहीं (koi baat nahi)
Hmong (White)Ua tsaugTsis ua licas (it's nothing)
Zoo siab pab (happy to help)
HungarianKöszi
Köszönöm
Köszönöm szépen
Szívesen
Nincs mit
IbanTerima kasih
Tabik basa
Sama-sama
Nadai ngawa'
IcelandicTakk
Takk fyrir
Þakka þér fyrir
Þakka þér kærlega fyrir
Kærar þakkir
Það var ekkert
IgboỊmela; dalụNdewo
IlokoAgyamanakAwan ania man
Inari SaamiTakkâ
Kijtto
Kijttoseh
Pyerrin liävus
IndonesianTerima kasih
Terima kasih banyak
Makasih (vinf)
Terima kasih kembali
Sama-sama
Dengan senang hati
IngushBarkal (thanks)
Barkal xalda hwuona (thanks be to you)
Saagha xalda hwa (thank you very much)
Deala reaza xalda hwuona (thank you very much)
 
Inuktitutᖁᔭᓇᐃᓐᓂ (Quyanainni)
ᖁᐅᓇ (Quana)
ᒪ'ᓇ (Ma'na)
ᖁᔭᓐᓇᒦᒃ (Qujannamiik)
ᓇᑯᕐᒦᒃ (Nakurmiik)
ᐃᓛᓕ (Ilaali)
IñupiaqQuyanaq
Qayaannaqpauraq
Taikuuqpauraq
Quyanaqpak
Taikuu
Taikuullapiaq
Quyaanna
Quyaana
Quyaanavak
Iliġanamiik
Akuqtuġikpiñ
Paġlagikpiñ
Ii
Ii'ii
Irish (Gaelic)Go raibh maith agat (sg)
Go raibh maith agaibh (pl)
Go raibh míle maith agat (sg)
Go raibh míle maith agaibh (pl)
Gura míle (inf)
’Sé do bheatha
Ná habair é
Tá fáilte romhat
ItalianGrazie
Molte grazie
Grazie mille
Prego
Italian (Roman dialect)Grazzie 
Japaneseどうも (dōmo)
ありがとう (arigatō)
ありがとうございます (arigatō gozaimasu)
どうもありがとう (dōmo arigatō)
どうもありがとうございます
(dōmo arigatō gozaimasu)
どういたしまして
(dō itashimashite)
Javaneseꦩꦠꦸꦂꦤꦸꦮꦸꦤ꧀
(Matur nuwun) (Kromo Inggil)
ꦠꦿꦶꦩꦱ꧀
(Trim) (Ngoko)
ꦱꦩꦶ-ꦱꦩꦶ
(Sami-sami) (Kromo Inggil)
ꦥꦣ-ꦥꦣ
(Pạdhạ-pạdhạ) (Ngoko)
JeneschHulasch 
JèrriaisMèrcie
Mèrcie bein des fais
I' n'y'a pon d'tchi
KalmykХанҗанав (Xanjanav)Учр уга (Učr uga) - No problem
Буйн болтха (Buyn boltxa) - You're welcome
Kannadaಧನ್ಯವಾದ (dhanyavāda)
ಧನ್ಯವಾದಗಳು (dhanyavādagaḷu)
ಯಾಕೆ ಸುಮ್ಮನೇ ಥ್ಯಾಂಕ್ಸು
(yāke summane ṭhanksu?)
ಪರವಾಗಿಲ್ಲ ಬಿಡಿ
(parwagilla biḍi)
Kashmiriशुकिया / شکریہ (shukriya)Kiheen chhu ne parvaai
KashubianDzãkùjã
Dzãka
Dzãczi
Baro proszã
KazakhРахмет! (Raxmet!) - genОқасы жоқ! (Oqası joq!) - gen
Тілеуіңіз болсын! (Tilewiñiz bolsın!) - frm
Тілеуің болсын! (Tilewiñ bolsın!) - inf
KhasiKhubleiYmleilei
Khmerឣរគុណ (’âu kŭn)ឣត់ឣីទេ (’ât ei té)
សូម​អញ្ជើញ (som ​’ânhcheunh)
Khoekhoe (Nama)Gangans.Aios.
KinyarwandaMurakoze
Urakoze
Ntacyo
KiribatiKo rab'a
Ko bati n rab'a
 
KlamathSepk'eec'a 
KlallamHáʔnəŋ cn 
Korean감사합니다 (kamsahamnida) - frm
고맙습니다 (komapsumnida) - frm
고마워 (komawo) - inf
아니에요 (anieyo)
!Kung San!Kin !ka 
KazakhРахмет! (Raxmet!) - genОқасы жоқ! (Oqası joq!) - gen
Тілеуіңіз болсын! (Tilewiñiz bolsın!) - frm
Тілеуің болсын! (Tilewiñ bolsın!) - inf
KumykБаракалла
(Barakalla)
Кёп баракалла
(Kyop barakalla)
Кёп иштагьлыкъ булан
(Kyop iştagьlıq bulan)
Kurdish (Kurmanji)Spas (frm)
Gelek spas (frm)
Zor spas (frm)
Spas dikem (frm)
Mala te avabe (frm)
Spas xwesh (frm)
Ser chava (frm)
Tishtek nabe (frm)
Tishtek pé nay e! (frm)
Kurdish (Sorani)Sipas dekem
(supas) سوپاس
شایانی نیه‌
KyrgyzРахмат (Rakhmat)
Чоң рахмат (Chong rakhmat)
Эчтеке эмес (Echteke emes)
Ladino(Grasyas) גראסיאס
(Mersí muncho) מירסי מונג׳ו
(De nada) די נאדה
Lakota SiouxPhilámayaye 
Laoຂອບໃຈ (khàwp ja̖i)
ຂອບໃຈຫລາຍໆ (khàwp ja̖i lãi lãi)
ບໍ່ເປັນຫຍັງ (baw pe̖n nyãng)
LatinGratias tibi ago (inf)
Gratias vobis ago (frm/pl)
Multas gratias vobis ago
Precare (sg)
Precamini (pl)
LatvianPaldies
Liels paldies
Vienmēr laipni
Lūdzu
Lazდიდი მარდი
(Didi mardi)
საღოლ
(Sağol)
სი მოხთით
(Si moxtit)
LezgiСагърай (Saghraj) - "be well"
Сагъ хьуй (Sagh xhuj)
Гзаф кьван сагърай (Gzaf q'wan saghraj)
Чухсагъул (Chuxsaghul)
LingalaMerci
Botondi
Natondi
Natondi yo
Ebote mingi
 
LithuanianAčiū
Dėkoju
Labai ačiū
Prašom
Low SaxonDank di (sg) Dank jo (pl)Nich daar för
LoziNi itumezi, mme/ndateU amuhezwi
LugandaWeebale (sg)
Weebale nnyo (sg)
Neyanzizza (sg - I'm grateful)
Weebale nnyo, weebale endala
Omulala aganye
Mwebale (pl)
Mwebale nnyo (pl)
Tweyanzizza (pl - We're grateful)
Kale
Si nnyo (not much)
Si ky'amaanyi (nothing important)
Lule SámiGijtto 
LuxembourgishMerci
Villmols merci
't ass gär geschitt
't ass näischt
MacedonianБлагодарам (Blagodaram)
Ви благодарам (Vi blagodaram) - frm
Молам Нема на што (Molam, nema na što)
Magahiधन्यवाद /d̪ʱənjəwaːd̪/कोय बात नयँ। /koj baːt̪ nəẽː/
MaithiliDhanyabadSwagatam
MalagasyMisaotra
Misaotra betsaka
Tsy misy fisaorana
MalayTerima kasihSama-sama
Malayalamനന്ദി (nāndi)
ഉപകാരം (upakaram)
നിങ്ങള്‍ക്കു സ്വാഗതം
(ningngaḷakku svāgatam)
Maldivian(Shukuriyyaa) ޝުކުރިއްޔާ(Maruhabaa) މަރުޙަބާ
MalteseGrazzi
Grazzi ħafna
Merħba bik
Ta' xejn
M'hemmx mn'hiex
Xejn, xejn
MamChjonte
Chjontexix
 
Manx (Gaelic)Gura mie ayd (sg)
Gura mie eu (pl)
Gura mie mooar ayd (sg)
Gura mie mooar eu (pl)
She dty vea
Māoriusually expressed through rising intonation or
Kia ora
 
Marathiआभारी आहे (ābhārī āhe)
धन्यवाद (dhanyāvad)
आपले स्वागत आहे (āpale svāgata āhe)
MarshalleseKom̧m̧ool (sg)
Kwe emmal (pl)
Kom̧m̧ooltata (Thank you very much)
Jouj
Kōn jouj
Mauritian CreoleMersi 
MonégasqueMerçi
Merçi tantu
 
Mayan (K'iche')Maltiox 
MíkmaqWela’lin (sg)
Wela’liek (sg)
Wela’lioq (pl)
Weliaq
MichifMarci 
MohawkNia:wen 
Monတင္ဂုန္ရ။
တင္ဂုန္ဗြဲမေလာန္
MongolianБаярлалаа (Bayarlalaa)
Гялайлаа (Gyalailaa)
Танд их баярлалаа (Tand ikh bayarlalaa )
Зүгээр (Zügeer)
MossiBarka
Barka woussogo
Pa sek ye
Ka sek ye
NahuatlTlazohcamati
Cenca tlazohcamati
Ahmitla ((It's) nothing)
NavajoAhéhee'
Tʼáá íiyisíí ahéheeʼ
Ahéhee'
Ndebele (Northern - Zimbabwe)NgiyabongaKulungile
Ndebele (Southern)Ngiyabonga (I am thanking)
Ngiyabonga kakhulu
Siyabonga (We are thanking)
e[surname of person being thanked]
Wamukelekile
Nepaliधन्यवाद
(dhanyabad)
no equivalent
Newari / Nepal Bhasaसुभाय् 
NiueanFakaaue
Fakaue lahi
 
NkoreWebare
Webare munonga
Webare kusiima (Thank you for appreciating)
NogaiСавболынъыз!
Рахмет! Муьсирев этемен!
Рахмет (Муьсиревим) сисге! (Thanks to you!)
Бек савболынъыз! (Thank you very much!)
 
Northern SothoKe a leboga
Ke a leboga kudu
Go leboga rena
Northern SámiGiituLeage buorre
NorwegianTakk (thanks)
Tusen Takk (a thousand thanks)
Mange Takk (many thanks)
Takk skal du ha
Ingen årsak
Vær så god
OccitanMercésAmb plaser!
OjibweMiigwech
Chi-miigwech
 
Okinawan御拝でーびーる (nifee deebiiru) - frm
御拝どー(nifee doo) - inf
一杯御拝でーびーる (ippee nifee deebiiru)
 
OmahaWíbthahoⁿ!Thatʰí tʰe udaⁿ
(Your welcome)
Oriyaଧନ୍ୟବାଦ୍ (Dhanẏabād)
ତୁମ୍ଭଙ୍କୁ ଧନ୍ଯବାଦ୍ (Thumbhaṅku dhanẏabād)
ଆପଣଙ୍କୁ ସ୍ବାଗତ
(Āpaṇanku sbāgata)
OssetianБузныг (Buznyg)
Арфæгонд у ут (Arfægond u ut)
Стыр бузныг дын уын (Styr buznyg)
Ницы кæны (Nicy kæny)
Ницы кæны, арфæйы аккаг нæу
(Nicy kæny, arfæjy akkag næu)
PapiamentoDanki
Masha danki
Na bo ordo (frm)
Di nada (inf)
Pashto(manana) مننه
(tashakor) تشكر
(har kala rasha) هر كله راش
Persian (Farsi)ممنونم
frm - (mamnūnam)
مرسي
vinf - (mersi)
متشكرم
vfrm - (moteshakkeram)
خواهش مي كنم
(khahesh mikonam)
PicardMerchi 
PiedmonteseGrassie
Grassie tant
 
PijinTanggio 
PohnpeianKalahngan (frm)
Menlau (inf)
Komw dehr kupwuroki
PolishDzięki (vinf)
Dziękuję
Serdecznie dziękuję
Dziękuję bardzo
Dziękuję pięknie
Proszę bardzo
Nie ma za co (inf)
PortugueseObrigado (m)
Obrigada (f)
Muito obrigado (m)
Muito obrigada (f)
Obrigadinho (m)
Obrigadinha (f)
Muito agradecido (m)
Muito agradecida (f)
Muito agradecidos (pl)
More details about saying thank you in Portuguese
Você é bem-vindo
Portuguese (Brazilian)Obrigado (m)
Obrigada (f)
Muito obrigado/a
Muito agradecido/a
More details about saying thank you in Portuguese
De nada (inf)
Não há de quê (frm)
Punjabiਧਨਵਾਦ / مہربانی (tànvād)
ਸ਼ੁਕਰੀਆ / شکریہ (shukrīā)
ਤੁਹਾਡਾ ਸੁਆਗਤ ਹੈ। / تہاڈا سواگت ہے۔ جی آیاں نوں
(tuhāɖā suāgat he)
ਕੋਈ ਨਹੀਂ। / کوئی نہیں (kōī nahī̃)
QuechuaSolpayki
Urpichay sonqoy
 
Rapa NuiMāuru-uru'O te aha no
Réunion CreoleMèrsi
Merssi
Romèrsi
Romèrsyé
Mèrsi bondyé Romèrsiman
 
RomanianMersi
Mulțumesc
Mulțumesc foarte mult
(Thank you very much)
Cu plăcere
RomanshGrazia
Grazia fitg
Engraziel
Anzi
RomaniNais
Nais tuke
 
RotumanNoaʼia 
RussianСпасибо! (Spasibo!)
Огpомное спасибо! (Ogromnoe spasibo!)
Большое спасибо! (Bol'šoe spasibo!)
Благодарю вас! (Blagodarju vas!) - frm
Не за что! (Ne za čto!)
Пожалуйста! (Požalujsta!)
RusynДякуву (Djakuvu)
Дякуву дуже красно (Djakuvu duže krasno)
Немаєте за што (Nemajete za što)
SakhaМахтал (maxtal)
Улахан махтал (ulaxan maxtal)
Баһыыба (bahɯɯba) - inf
Баһаалыста (bahaalɯsta)
SamoanFa'afetai
Fa'afetai tele
E le afaina
SangoSingîla
Singîla mingi
Sengue
Sanskritधन्यवादाः (dhanyavādāḥ)अस्तु तावत् (astu tāvat)
Sardinian (Logudorese)Grazie
Grazie meda
De nudda
ScotsThank yeNae problem
Scottish GaelicTapadh leat (inf)
Tapadh leibh (frm/pl)
Taing mhór
Móran taing
'S e do bheatha (inf)
'Se ur beatha (frm/pl)
SepediKe a leboga 
SerbianХвала (Hvala)
Хвала лепо (Hvala lepo)
Хвала вам (Hvala vam)
Много вам хвала (Mnogo vam hvala)
Молим (Molim)
SerranoHakupvu' 'a'ayWerre'
SesothoKe a leboha
Ke a leboha haholo
WATCH THE VIDEO ON THEME: Learn to say ' Thank You ' in 12 languages

Here's how to say thank you in 50 languages so you're never stuck again. spoken (and you don't speak the language) can be challenging at times. .. really great post about saying thanks in different languages. great job i.

Thank You in 100 Languages

As anyone who has tried to blag a vocab test will know, words really don’t have any logic to them. You can’t just “work out” what the German word for “fridge” is. That’s because, of course, words are arbitrary. Cat (or katze or chat) only means “cat” because at some stage people came to agree that it did. Words may share roots and flit across language barriers, but because there’s such a vast number of sounds a human can make, it’s very unlikely that we’d all spontaneously come up with the same word for the same thing.

Except that, apparently, we have. That word is “huh”. According to a recent study it seems to be pretty universal. The scientists (in what sounds like an excellent idea for a research trip), recorded bits of informal language from 5 continents, and of the 31 dialects they compiled, all had this same word in common.

My first thought in reading their findings was “hmmm”. Is “huh” even a word? It seems more like an instinctive utterance - the kind of sound we make when confused. Noises of surprise or anger might be the same everywhere, but that’s because they are not really part of a language. They’re just noises.

But the researchers do a fairly good job of arguing that “huh” is, in fact, a word. It’s not involuntary, and it follows the rules of a given language: if questions are posed with rising intonation, “huh” rises too, and vice versa (it fell in two of the dialects). It is also possible for children and language learners to get “huh” wrong by using it out of context. You can’t get noises of astonishment wrong.

So why is “huh” everywhere? Here’s where the research gets interesting. “Huh”, the scientists suggest, is the only word that can do that particular job. This means you could, technically, work the word out in a vocab test. And if children were really thorough inventors of made up languages, they’d have to include “huh”. 

It happens that at certain points in a conversation we need a word that can do a large number of things all at once. It must: 1) say there is a problem, 2) signal that the problem has to do with a lack of knowledge, and 3) ask for a response, without being sure what that response might be. But there is also pressure on the word to be as short as possible: it is a correction signal, so it should not disturb the rhythms of the language too much. And so we got “huh”: the ultimate low effort word (to make it you only need a tiny constriction of the vocal tract at its narrowest point), but capable of expressing as much bafflement as you can put into it.

You might say that environmental forces squeezed this word into shape. We see this happen in biology - sharks and dolphins, under the same constraints, independently developed similar body shapes - but rarely in language. In fact, this is the first clear case of such powers at work. 

But it strikes me there is a new wave of strong and identical pressures on words across the world. As dialects are squeezed into 140 characters, and thousands struggle to come up with the perfect tweet of the moment, (instantly rewarding those who do) there is language mutation like no other. And across cultures we all tweet the same way - Twitter’s mood swings are the one of the most predictable phenomenons out there.

Thousands of years of language use produced a single universal word. My guess is the next one will emerge on Twitter.

thanks in every language

The only word in the world that can do its particular job.

thanks in every language
Written by Mazusar
2 Comments
  • Voodookinos

    VoodookinosMay 06, 2019 3:00 AM

    I am sorry, I can help nothing. But it is assured, that you will find the correct decision. Do not despair.

  • Fekree

    FekreeApril 30, 2019 5:53 PM

    Many thanks for an explanation, now I will know.

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