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Thank you for your compliment

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Thank you for your compliment
May 03, 2019 Houseguest Thanks 3 comments

After last week’s post How to Pay a Compliment, I received many comments and emails asking for a follow-up post on how to graciously receive a compliment. Many readers told me they had a hard time accepting praise.

I empathize with them, because I’ve been there.  When I used to receive compliments, I would deny, deflect, explain away, apologize or otherwise stick my foot in my mouth before it ever occurred to me to gracefully say “thank you.”  But that’s all it takes.

To graciously accept a compliment, all you need to say is “thank you.” (Then, stop talking!)

You’re being praised.  You don’t need to wow your complimenter, make them laugh or tell them they’re wrong.  If the compliment is sincerely meant, you can’t go wrong with a simple, sincere “thank you.”  If you have a history of putting your foot in your mouth at moments like these, stick to this fail-safe strategy:  say your thanks and bite your tongue!

Okay, I’ve quit embarrassing myself when receiving compliments.  What are some other gracious things I could say?

1.  Say “thank you,” and then add a bit of personal information. This one’s my favorite.  “Those are really beautiful earrings.”  “Thank you, they were a gift from my grandmother.”

2.  Say “thank you,” and share your feelings about the subject. “That dress you made for Sarah turned out really well.  “Thank you, I really enjoyed making it.”

3.  Say “thank you,” and reflect some glory back to the complimenter.“That fundraiser you worked so hard on turned out really well.”  “Thank you.  That means a lot, coming from you.”

How do I respond to an awkward compliment?

People say the strangest things.  If someone gives you a strange compliment, try a gentle (and vague) answer. “Thank you, that’s the nicest thing I’ve heard all day.”  “What a kind thing to say.”

How do I reply to an insincere or sarcastic complement?

Sadly, this happens–and there are two ways to go here.  You can give a vague response (“How kind”), or a simple “thank you.” If that seems inappropriate, you can take a tip from Anne of Green Gables, and say “Why, that almost sounds like a compliment.” If you’re going to go this direction, it is essential to use a light, funny tone.

Remember, when you’re receiving a compliment, you’re receiving the opinion of another person.  Honor that opinion. (If being praised makes you uncomfortable, stick to a simple “thank you” and your complimenter will never know.)

Sometimes we deny and deflect praise out of a sense of modesty, but what we’re really doing is telling the complimenter that their opinion is wrong.  Don’t make this mistake!  Don’t shut yourself off to praise–acknowledge it.  You and your complimenter will both be the better for it.

*** This subject makes me want to re-readHave You Filled a Bucket Today? which discusses kindness using the metaphor of a bucket.  It’s a kids’ book, but that doesn’t mean grown-ups won’t enjoy it.

image source: flickr user jlunar

26 comments Comment

Do your toes curl at the mere thought of someone complimenting you? Are you a master at rebuffing praise? Well no more! Rhona features in this article for Boots Health & Beauty magazine on how to receive compliments with grace and ease, feel more comfortable with letting love in and allowing your self-esteem to rise!

Rhona: “In British culture especially it is seen as taboo to be big-headed or have an over-inflated sense of self. However it’s a myth that accepting compliments will mean we will think too much of ourselves. In fact they are essential to our personal growth and sense of being appreciated. When we observe someone behaving with arrogance that is actually due to a lack of self-love, you cannot have ‘too much self-love.'” 

“If you do feel uncomfortable receiving praise it is usually because it conflicts with your own opinion of yourself, for example, if someone says “You’re beautiful” and you don’t feel it inside, you’ll push the compliment away, allowing your inner critic to take over and maintain status quo.”

“Suggestions for how to start to believe nice things about ourself might begin with writing down what you do like about yourself. Write them in a notebook or even on your smartphone – whichever works for you. Carrying these with you helps as a reminder of what you already like about yourself and will help normalise the idea that other people will like, and notice, wonderful things about you too.” 

“Affirmations are also a great way to strengthen feeling good about yourself, but they need to feel believable  and make sure you put “I choose..” at the beginning e.g. “I choose to notice how loveable I am” as this has been found to silence the inner critic and make the statement more powerful.” 

“When you do receive a compliment, say thank you! Get into the habit of saying it every time. Let it just hang in the air, don’t say anything else. Initially you might feel awkward or uncomfortable, but stay with it and that feeling will go. Like any muscle, becoming comfortable with receiving compliments will strengthen with practice.” 

Feature by Danielle Hine in Boots Health & Beauty Magazine, March/April 2016 issue.

Top image by Rhona Clews.

 

Translate Thank you so much for your compliment. See Spanish-English translations with audio pronunciations, examples, and word-by-word explanations.

After last week’s post How to Pay a Compliment, I received many comments and emails asking for a follow-up post on how to graciously receive a compliment. Many readers told me they had a hard time accepting praise.

I empathize with them, because I’ve been there.  When I used to receive compliments, I would deny, deflect, explain away, apologize or otherwise stick my foot in my mouth before it ever occurred to me to gracefully say “thank you.”  But that’s all it takes.

To graciously accept a compliment, all you need to say is “thank you.” (Then, stop talking!)

You’re being praised.  You don’t need to wow your complimenter, make them laugh or tell them they’re wrong.  If the compliment is sincerely meant, you can’t go wrong with a simple, sincere “thank you.”  If you have a history of putting your foot in your mouth at moments like these, stick to this fail-safe strategy:  say your thanks and bite your tongue!

Okay, I’ve quit embarrassing myself when receiving compliments.  What are some other gracious things I could say?

1.  Say “thank you,” and then add a bit of personal information. This one’s my favorite.  “Those are really beautiful earrings.”  “Thank you, they were a gift from my grandmother.”

2.  Say “thank you,” and share your feelings about the subject. “That dress you made for Sarah turned out really well.  “Thank you, I really enjoyed making it.”

3.  Say “thank you,” and reflect some glory back to the complimenter.“That fundraiser you worked so hard on turned out really well.”  “Thank you.  That means a lot, coming from you.”

How do I respond to an awkward compliment?

People say the strangest things.  If someone gives you a strange compliment, try a gentle (and vague) answer. “Thank you, that’s the nicest thing I’ve heard all day.”  “What a kind thing to say.”

How do I reply to an insincere or sarcastic complement?

Sadly, this happens–and there are two ways to go here.  You can give a vague response (“How kind”), or a simple “thank you.” If that seems inappropriate, you can take a tip from Anne of Green Gables, and say “Why, that almost sounds like a compliment.” If you’re going to go this direction, it is essential to use a light, funny tone.

Remember, when you’re receiving a compliment, you’re receiving the opinion of another person.  Honor that opinion. (If being praised makes you uncomfortable, stick to a simple “thank you” and your complimenter will never know.)

Sometimes we deny and deflect praise out of a sense of modesty, but what we’re really doing is telling the complimenter that their opinion is wrong.  Don’t make this mistake!  Don’t shut yourself off to praise–acknowledge it.  You and your complimenter will both be the better for it.

*** This subject makes me want to re-readHave You Filled a Bucket Today? which discusses kindness using the metaphor of a bucket.  It’s a kids’ book, but that doesn’t mean grown-ups won’t enjoy it.

image source: flickr user jlunar

26 comments | Comment

Thanks for your compliment on/about

thank you for your compliment

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"You’re beautiful!"

"You’re handsome!"

"You’re sexy!"

"You’re brilliant!"

"You smell good."

"You have a heart of gold."

These are just some of the many compliments people tell one another on a daily basis. Some are said with good intentions. And some are spoken with all sorts of purposes in mind. Thus, a discerning eye is needed to properly skim through them all and see what is good and what is bad.

Let’s not stray too far from the main topic here though!

This list exists to give you some ideas on how to poke some fun and wit whenever you’re trying to respond to compliments. A simple "thank you" is always welcome, but it just doesn’t cut it anymore in some other cases. Well, you’ve been graced by luck because this list is here to help you out!

You can use any of the replies found here, but only with prudence. Some may sound different depending on how you say them or what kind of context you’re in. Just remember: “Always be gracious and kind whenever you can!” You know you’re better than any compliment in the world.

WATCH THE VIDEO ON THEME: How to Respond to "Thank You" in Different Situations

Thank you for your compliment. Really appreciate it.:).

Guidelines and Expressions for Accepting Compliments

Cuchuflete, "commented" just obfuscates the point that I'm trying to make, which is that given the nature of the social construct that modesty is a virtue, one might want to temper their acknowledgment of praise, not because I in any way endorse doing so, but because it is societal custom under the framework of not wanting to draw too much attention to one's self.

Let's fetch the objective definitions of on and about respectively.

You're right; let's not make a value judgment and instead choose to base our decisions on empirical evidence.

12.with respect or regard to (used to indicate the object of an action directed against or toward): Let's play a joke on him. Write a critical essay on Shakespeare. www.dictionary.com



2.connected or associated with: There was an air of mystery about him.



"all around or on all sides; "dirty clothes lying around (or about)"; "let's look about for help'"

"in or somewhere near: He is about the house."

"of; concerning; in regard to: instructions about the work; a book about the Civil War."


There is a fundamental difference between on and about.

On is simply a continuation that links the two independent concepts. It actually focuses ON the dress, and by so doing, it leaves it at that. The compliment is on the dress.

About is a much richer word that also bonds the compliment to the dress, but it differs in that it backs out and refers to the associations, the connections about the dress. About is a circumscription of the subject of the concept, so naturally the question that one is left to wonder is

What about the dress?

On is simple and succinct; it does not ask anything more than to acknowledge that the compliment is on the dress.

About perpetrates an aura of association and connections and relationships ABOUT the dress.

It's is self evident, no less, that "about" says more than "on."

 

thank you for your compliment

WATCH THE VIDEO ON THEME: Respond to Compliments in English—The Right and Wrong Ways

If the compliment is sincerely meant, you can't go wrong with a simple, sincere “ thank you.” If you have a history of putting your foot in your.

thank you for your compliment
Written by Zololl
3 Comments
  • Moogura

    MooguraMay 10, 2019 8:46 AM

    Unequivocally, excellent answer

  • Dudal

    DudalMay 04, 2019 12:43 AM

    Thanks for an explanation, I too consider, that the easier, the better �

  • Mikazragore

    MikazragoreMay 06, 2019 4:27 PM

    Yes cannot be!

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