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Poems on gratitude and thanksgiving

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Poems on gratitude and thanksgiving
June 09, 2019 Misc. Thanks 5 comments

16 Thanksgiving Poems

A collection of thanksgiving poems to share with others and to encourage us to be grateful for all the blessings we have in our lives.

Be Thankful
Poet Unknown

Be thankful that you don't already have everything you desire.
If you did, what would there be to look forward to?
Be thankful when you don't know something,
for it gives you the opportunity to learn.

Be thankful for the difficult times.
During those times you grow.
Be thankful for your limitations,
because they give you opportunities for improvement.
Be thankful for each new challenge,
because it will build your strength and character.

Be thankful for your mistakes.
They will teach you valuable lessons.
Be thankful when you're tired and weary,
because it means you've made a difference.

It's easy to be thankful for the good things.
A life of rich fulfillment comes to those who
are also thankful for the setbacks.
Gratitude can turn a negative into a positive.
Find a way to be thankful for your troubles,
and they can become your blessings.



"Thanksgiving, after all, is a word of action." W. J. Cameron - Thanksgiving Quotes


What's The Use
Poet: Douglas Malloch

What's the use of always weepin',
Making trouble last?
What's the use of always keepin'
Thinkin' of the past?
Each must have his tribulation -
Water with his wine;
Life, it ain't no celebration,
Trouble - I've had mine -
But today is fine!


Thankful For Many Things
Poet: Julie Hebert

I am thankful for my family,
My friends I feel the same.
Life is filled with many thanks,
Life is the perfect game.

Life is filled with treasures,
If you're a lucky one.
Be grateful and be humble,
And share them with someone.

But one thing we must remember,
We are not the one to thank.
There is a higher power here,
That we must give first rank.

I am thankful for my life,
And all that it holds.
I'm excited to see what's next for me,
Lets see how it unfolds.



"When one is thankful for the blessings in their life, they are choosing to attract more positivity and abundance." Michael Austin Jacobs
Blessed



In Everything Give Thanks
Poet: Unknown

For all that God in mercy sends -
For health and children, home and friends;
For comfort in the time of need,
For every kindly word and deed,
For happy talks and holy thoughts;
For guidance in our daily walk -
In everything give thanks!

For beauty in this world of ours,
For verdant grass and lovely flowers,
For song of birds, for horn of bees,
For the refreshing summer breeze,
For hill and plain, for streams and wood,
For the great ocean's mighty flood -
In everything give thanks!

For the sweet sleep which comes with night,
For the returning morning's light,
For the bright sun that shines on high,
For the stars glittering in the sky -
For these and everything we see,
O Lord our hearts we lift to thee;
In everything give thanks!



Words of Encouragement



Thanksgiving
Poet: Edgar A. Guest

Gettin' together to smile an' rejoice,
An' eatin' an' laughin' with folks of your choice;
An' kissin' the girls an' declarin' that they
Are growin more beautiful day after day;
Chattin' an' braggin' a bit with the men,
Buildin' the old family circle again;
Livin' the wholesome an' old-fashioned cheer,
Just for awhile at the end of the year.

Greetings fly fast as we crowd through the door
And under the old roof we gather once more
Just as we did when the youngsters were small;
Mother's a little bit grayer, that's all.
Father's a little bit older, but still
Ready to romp an' to laugh with a will.
Here we are back at the table again
Tellin' our stories as women an men.

Bowed are our heads for a moment in prayer;
Oh, but we're grateful an' glad to be there.
Home from the east land an' home from the west,
Home with the folks that are dearest an' best.
Out of the sham of the cities afar
We've come for a time to be just what we are.
Here we can talk of ourselves an' be frank,
Forgettin' position an' station an' rank.

Give me the end of the year an' its fun
When most of the plannin' an' toilin' is done;
Bring all the wanderers home to the nest,
Let me sit down with the ones I love best,
Hear the old voices still ringin' with song,
See the old faces unblemished by wrong,
See the old table with all of its chairs
An I'll put soul in my Thanksgivin' prayers.


Trees
Poet: Greta Zwaan, © 1978

Oh, the splendour of the autumn when the shades of colour glow;
When the trees dressed in their glory stir up shadows to and fro.

When the twilight sun is sinking, dusk embraces Mother Earth;
What a joy to catch the splendour, moments of unmeasured worth.

Stop a while and ponder nature, thank the Lord for all you see;
For our use and for their beauty, God created every tree.


A Special Day
Poet: Julie Hebert

Thanksgiving is a special day,
A day we give our thanks.
For all the people in our lives,
And the money in our banks.

Thanksgiving is a special day,
A day we share the joy.
We come before a lavish meal,
One we quite enjoy.

Thanksgiving is a special day,
Togetherness, all families the same.
Time spent in happiness,
We may even plan a game.

But most importantly Thanksgiving,
Is a day to remember.
Be grateful for all you have all year,
January straight through to December.



"Display, a life full of gratitude, and remember to give thanks each day."
Danielle Duckery
Gratitude



Thankful Heart
Poet: Henry Coyle

Father, we lift our thankful hearts to Thee
With gratitude, for all Thy bounty free,
For love, and friends, for home, for faith's pure light,
For health, for harvest store, for rest at night -

For every blessing showered from above -
Bestowed on us unstinted, by Thy Love
And thoughtful care; O hear us, as we pray,
Father in heaven, this Thanksgiving day.

Watch over us, be Thou our Stay and Guide,
Thro' day and night; guard us from sinful pride,
For we are human, weak and prone to wrong,
And by Thy grace alone are we made strong.

Give us our dally bread, our wants supply,
And touch our hearts that we may not deny
The widow and the orphan of their share
Of what we have - relieve their want and care.

O grant that we may keep Thy law, and live
A Christian life; our enemies forgive;
That we may love our neighbor, work for peace.
That so Thy glory may on earth increase.



"Give thanks not just on Thanksgiving Day, but every day of your life.
Appreciate and never take for granted all that you have."
Catherine Pulsifer
Appreciation Quotes



Give Thanks
Poet: Julie Hebert

The days we do give thanks,
We are grateful for what we were given.
The house, our family and friends,
And what waits for us in Heaven.

But there are more than the eye sees,
And more we should give thanks.
Our lives are more than people and objects,
Their more than what's in the banks.

Have you ever thought,
What it would be like.
To live in a world of anguish,
A world full of strife?

Be thankful for your surrounds,
The safety to walk down the street.
The schools and abilities to learn,
And the food we sit down to eat.



God Deserves The Credit
Poet: Greta Zwaan, © 2010

I have a goodly heritage, the blessings flow my way;
Great beauty, peace and majesty are granted me each day.
There's peace of mind and peace of heart and freedom in my land,
Not brought through what I have achieved, not by the will of man.

These are the gifts passed on from God, not something I have earned,
But grace and mercy touched God's heart, which man cannot discern.
Why should my God, a holy God, pay mind to lowly me?
While others are afflicted and longing to be free?

This land of grace, my Canada, that shines from coast to coast,
United Nations claims it's first! And, oh how we do boast!
Should not the credit go to God who made all things from dust?
Who gently holds the universe, whose power we can trust?

Yet man-made laws have ruined so much, directing his own way,
Not heeding laws that God assigned, but setting things array.
Oh, God, have mercy, turn us back, that we might seek Your face,
Forgive us for our wayward life, extend once more Your grace.

Create in us awareness of what You'd have us do,
Help us to recognize the fact that we owe all to You.


The key to being a wonderful writer is not to write. You just get out of the way.
Leave room for God to walk in the room. And when I write something that I know is right,
I get on my knees and say 'thank you.'
Michael Jackson
Thank You



Thanksgiving
Poet: Wilhelmina Stitch

Thank God for this!
That once again we are alive to greet the spring;
To smell the earth, fresh-washed with rain
To watch each little growing thing;
And, watching, feel each bud and leaf
Are symbols of the death of grief.
To think we're privileged to see laburnum's graceful gold cascade;
The pink and white fragility of dainty springtime's hill and glade;
And seeing, feel desire to praise
The Source of all these beauteous days.

Thank God for this!
That we can feel a burgeoning within the heart;
That springtime has the power to heal the wound of grief,
Its pain and smart;
Reveal a new and friendly earth where blossom joy and cheer and mirth.

Thank God for this!
We see His face framed in the loveliness of spring,
We see the workings of His grace in every little growing thing.
We see His face, we hear His voice
Bidding all downcast souls rejoice.



"This most of all is the message of Thanksgiving:
Everything really will be all right."
Sam Sifton, Thanksgiving
Inspirational Quotes



The ABC's of Thanksgiving
Poet: Unknown

Although things are not perfect;
Because of trail or pain;
Continue in Thanksgiving;
Do not begin to blame;

Even when the times are hard;
Fierce winds are bound to blow;
God is forever able;
Hold on to what you know;

Imagine life without His love;
Joy would cease to be;
Keep thanking Him for all the things;
Love imparts to thee;

Move out of "Camp complaining";
No weapon that is known;
On earth can yield the power;
Praise can do alone;

Quit looking at the future;
Redeem the time at hand;
Start every day with worship;
To "thank" is a command;

Until we see Him coming;
Victorious in the sky;
We'll run the race with gratitude;
Xalting God most high;

Yes, there’ll be good times and yes some will be bad; but . . .
Zion waits in glory...where none are ever sad!


Night's Blessings
Poet: Eldred Herbert

When I go to bed and cannot sleep,
I don't waste time by counting sheep;
I count all my blessings, one by one,
From the early morn tiill the settling sun;
The day so new, the sunrise so clear,
I started my day with thankful prayer;
Thanked God for husband and children two,
Freckled-face boy, girl with eyes of blue.

Thanked God for ability to work,
And from life's battle I did not shirk;
I thanked Him for guidance through the day,
He is my Buckler from tempter's sway.
And when I was tempted to be rude,
I turned to my Lord in solitude;
His strength sufficient, my soul restored,
Just one more blessing from the Lord.

When day is done and I lay in bed,
I feel God's blessing upon me spread.
If you are restless and cannot sleep,
Just count your blessing's instead of sheep;
You will find the solitude is right,
You will feel His presence in the night;
Then rest shall come, repose in sleep,
When you count blessings instead of sheep.


What Am I Really Thankful For?
Poet: Greta Zwaan, © 1979

What am I really thankful for? Abundant supply, enough and more?
A warm, cozy home with carpeted floor? Safety behind the lock on my door?
Oh, yes, I admit I take comfort in these: the joys of my life, the pleasures, the ease.
I’m happy for freedom to do as I please, attend social evening and afternoon teas.
Consider the fact that I've worked to obtain, through the strength of my body, material gain.

I accomplished great things, I did it with strain, sometimes with heartache and even with pain.
But I've carved for myself a name that is known, important position, esteem that has grown.
Perhaps, in the process I've trampled a few who could not decipher the tricks that I knew,
Some gullible men who trusted my word, they accepted my plans and all that they heard.

But when you consider the gains that I've made, I can't stop to worry or go to their aid.
We all know the saying, "Look out for your own," so I'm my own maker, a fact that's well known.
Perhaps in the future I'll ease off a bit, but now is the time to "get all you can get.'
Maybe tomorrow I’ll think about God, and even consider His staff and His rod.

Someone once told me He created the earth, upholds and sustains it, and gave all things birth.
I'm really not certain that that could be true; I do believe that your life's up to you.
If God is creator and all man is His, then why do I struggle just to find bliss?
I’ve worked since my childhood to get what I craved, to find satisfaction from earnings I’ve saved.

I'm still not content, there's got to be more - the end of the rainbow, that faraway shore.
I'll keep on achieving and persevere through; it's my only solution, that's all I can do.
If you find a method that’s better than mine, I wish you would tell me or write me a line.
A way of rejoicing, for peace and contentment; a satisfied heart and no more resentment.

I've not much time left for I'm climbing in years, and as I grow older I'm discovering fears:
Fears of tomorrow, of things that might be; if you have the answer then help set me free.
I've no other method, I've no other way, but if you can help me, then help me TODAY!!



Thanksgiving
Poet: James Whitcomb Riley, 1849 - 1916

Let us be thankful - not only because
Since last our universal thanks were told
We have grown greater in the world’s applause,
And fortune's newer smiles surpass the old -

But thankful for all things that come as alms
From out the open hand of Providence: -
The winter clouds and storms - the summer calms -
The sleepless dread - the drowse of indolence.

Let us be thankful - thankful for the prayers
Whose gracious answers were long, long delayed,
That they might fall upon us unawares,
And bless us, as in greater need we prayed.

Let us be thankful for the loyal hand
That love held out in welcome to our own,
When love and only love could understand
The need of touches we had never known.

Let us be thankful for the longing eyes
That gave their secret to us as they wept,
Yet in return found, with a sweet surprise,
Love's touch upon their lids, and, smiling, slept.

And let us, too, be thankful that the tears
Of sorrow have not all been drained away,
That through them still, for all the coming years,
We may look on the dead face of To-day.


Barren Trees
Poet: Greta Zwaan, © 2014

The summer sun has weakened, its rays no longer strong;
The leaves have changed their colors; it's fall before too long.
The trees have become barren; the wind removed their clothes;
Forlorn they stand there naked, reflecting on their woes.

In spring they're rich with blossoms, their fragrance fills the air;
Proud sentinels, like soldiers, they move and sway with flair.
Their summer fruit is plenteous, their boughs bent down with weight;
Delicious, sun-drenched offerings, the quality first rate!

Then comes the fall, the harvest, the fruit is gathered in;
The trees have done their duty, they've served their land again.
But now they're not producing, they'll have a well-earned rest;
And mankind might applaud them; they've done their very best.


Related:
Christian Poems         Christmas Poems

“The Profound Power of Gratitude,” Ensign, Sept. 2005, 2–8

While journeying to Jerusalem, Jesus “passed through the midst of Samaria and Galilee.

“And as he entered into a certain village, there met him ten men that were lepers, which stood afar off:

“And they lifted up their voices, and said, Jesus, Master, have mercy on us.

“And when he saw them, he said unto them, Go shew yourselves unto the priests. And it came to pass, that, as they went, they were cleansed.

“And one of them, when he saw that he was healed, turned back, and with a loud voice glorified God,

“And fell down on his face at his feet, giving him thanks: and he was a Samaritan.

“And Jesus answering said, Were there not ten cleansed? but where are the nine?

“There are not found that returned to give glory to God, save this stranger.

“And he said unto him, Arise, go thy way: thy faith hath made thee whole.”1

From the 30th Psalm, David pledges, “O Lord my God, I will give thanks unto thee for ever.”2

The Apostle Paul, in his epistle to the Corinthians, proclaimed, “Thanks be unto God for his unspeakable gift.”3 And to the Thessalonians, “In every thing give thanks: for this is the will of God.”4

Do we give thanks to God “for his unspeakable gift” and His rich blessings so abundantly bestowed upon us?

Do we pause and ponder Ammon’s words? “Now my brethren, we see that God is mindful of every people, whatsoever land they may be in; yea, he numbereth his people, … over all the earth. Now this is my joy, and my great thanksgiving; yea, and I will give thanks unto my God forever.”5

Robert W. Woodruff, a prominent business leader of a former time, toured the United States giving a lecture which he entitled “A Capsule Course in Human Relations.” In his message, he said that the two most important words in the English language are these: “Thank you.”

Gracias, danke, merci—whatever language is spoken, “thank you” frequently expressed will cheer your spirit, broaden your friendships, and lift your lives to a higher pathway as you journey toward perfection. There is a simplicity—even a sincerity—when “thank you” is spoken.

The beauty and eloquence of an expression of gratitude is reflected in a newspaper story of some years ago:

The District of Columbia police auctioned off about 100 unclaimed bicycles Friday. “One dollar,” said an 11-year-old boy as the bidding opened on the first bike. The bidding, however, went much higher. “One dollar,” the boy repeated hopefully each time another bike came up.

The auctioneer, who had been auctioning stolen or lost bikes for 43 years, noticed that the boy’s hopes seemed to soar higher whenever a racer-type bicycle was put up.

Then there was just one racer left. The bidding went to eight dollars. “Sold to that boy over there for nine dollars!” said the auctioneer. He took eight dollars from his own pocket and asked the boy for his dollar. The youngster turned it over in pennies, nickels, dimes, and quarters—took his bike, and started to leave. But he went only a few feet. Carefully parking his new possession, he went back, gratefully threw his arms around the auctioneer’s neck, and cried.

When was the last time we felt gratitude as deeply as did this boy? The deeds others perform in our behalf might not be as poignant, but certainly there are kind acts that warrant our expressions of gratitude.

The song frequently sung in the Sunday School of our youth placed the spirit of thanksgiving into the depths of our souls:

Astronaut Gordon Cooper, while orbiting the earth over 40 years ago, offered this sweet and simple prayer of thanks: “Father, thank You, especially for letting me fly this flight. Thank You for the privilege of being able to be in this position: to be up in this wondrous place, seeing all these many startling, wonderful things that You have created.”7

We are thankful for blessings we cannot measure, for gifts we cannot appraise, “for books, music, art, and for the great inventions which make these blessings available[;] … for the laughter of little children[;] … for the … means for relieving human suffering … and increasing … the enjoyment of life[;] … for everything good and uplifting.”8

The prophet Alma urged, “Counsel with the Lord in all thy doings, and he will direct thee for good; yea, when thou liest down at night lie down unto the Lord, that he may watch over you in your sleep; and when thou risest in the morning let thy heart be full of thanks unto God; and if ye do these things, ye shall be lifted up at the last day.”9

I would like to mention three instances where I believe a sincere “thank you” could lift a heavy heart, inspire a good deed, and bring heaven’s blessings closer to the challenges of our day.

First, may I ask that we express thanks to our parents for life, for caring, for sacrificing, for laboring to provide a knowledge of our Heavenly Father’s plan for happiness.

From Sinai the words thunder to our conscience, “Honour thy father and thy mother: that thy days may be long upon the land which the Lord thy God giveth thee.”10

I know of no sweeter expression toward a parent than that spoken by our Savior upon the cross: “When Jesus therefore saw his mother, and the disciple standing by, whom he loved, he saith unto his mother, Woman, behold thy son!

“Then saith he to the disciple, Behold thy mother! And from that hour that disciple took her unto his own home.”11

Next, have we thought on occasion of a certain teacher at school or at church who seemed to quicken our desire to learn, who instilled in us a commitment to live with honor?

The story is told of a group of men who were talking about people who had influenced their lives and for whom they were grateful. One man thought of a high school teacher who had introduced him to Tennyson. He decided to write and thank her. In time, written in a feeble scrawl, came the teacher’s reply:

“My Dear Willie:

“I can’t tell you how much your note meant to me. I am in my 80s, living alone in a small room, cooking my own meals, lonely and like the last leaf lingering behind. You will be interested to know that I taught school for 50 years, and yours is the first note of appreciation I have ever received. It came on a blue, cold morning, and it cheered me as nothing has for years.”

We owe an eternal debt of gratitude to all of those, past and present, who have given so much of themselves that we might have so much ourselves.

Third, I mention an expression of “thank you” to one’s peers. The teenage years can be difficult for the teens themselves as well as for their parents. These are trying times in the life of a boy or a girl. Each boy wants to make the football team; each girl wants to be the beauty queen. “Many are called, but few are chosen”12 could have an application here.

Let me share with you a modern-day miracle which occurred several years ago at Murray High School near Salt Lake City, where every person was a winner and not a loser was to be found.

A newspaper article highlighted the event. The article was entitled “Tears, Cheers and True Spirit: Students Elect 2 Disabled Girls to Murray Royalty.” The article began: “Ted and Ruth Eyre did what any parents would do.

“When their daughter, Shellie, became a finalist for Murray High School homecoming queen, they counseled her to be a good sport in case she didn’t win. They explained only one girl among the 10 candidates would be selected queen. …

“As student body officers crowned the school’s homecoming [royalty] in the school gym Thursday night, Shellie Eyre experienced, instead, inclusion. The 17-year-old senior, born with Down syndrome, was selected by fellow students as homecoming queen. … As Ted Eyre escorted his daughter onto the gym floor as the candidates were introduced, the gym erupted into deafening cheers and applause. They were greeted with a standing ovation.”

Similar standing ovations were extended to Shellie’s attendants, one of whom, April Perschon, has physical and mental disabilities resulting from a brain hemorrhage suffered when she was just 10 years old.

When the ovations had ceased, the school’s vice principal said, “‘Tonight … the students voted on inner beauty.’ … Obviously moved, parents, school administrators and students wept openly.”

Said one student, “I’m so happy, I cried when they came out. I think Murray High is so awesome to do this.”13

I extend a heartfelt “thank you” to one and all who made this night one ever to be remembered. The Scottish poet James Barrie’s words seem appropriate: “God gave us memories, that we might have June roses in the December of our lives.”14

One hot August day some years ago, there occurred a tragedy in Salt Lake County. It was reported in the local and national press. Five beautiful little girls—so young, so vibrant, so loving—hiding away, as children often do in their games of hide-and-seek, entered the trunk of a parent’s car. The trunk lid was pulled shut, they were unable to escape, and all perished from heat exhaustion.15

The entire community was so kind, so thoughtful, so caring in the passing of those five little girls. Flowers, food, calls, visits, and prayers were shared with their families.

On the Sunday after the devastating event occurred, long lines of automobiles filled with grieving occupants drove ever so slowly past the home that was the scene of the accident. Sister Monson and I wished to be among those who expressed condolences in this way. As we drove by, we felt we were on holy ground. We literally crept along at a snail’s pace along the street. It was as though we could visualize a traffic sign reading, “Please drive slowly; children at play.” Tears filled our eyes and compassion flowed from our hearts. In two of the three families involved, the deceased children were all the children they had.

Frequently death comes as an intruder. It is an enemy that suddenly appears in the midst of life’s feast, putting out its lights and gaiety. It visits the aged as they walk on faltering feet. Its summons is heard by those who have scarcely reached midway in life’s journey, and often it hushes the laughter of little children.

At the funeral services for the five little angels, I counseled: “There is one phrase which should be erased from your thinking and from the words you speak aloud. It is the phrase ‘If only.’ It is counterproductive and is not conducive to the spirit of healing and of peace. Rather, recall the words of Proverbs: ‘Trust in the Lord with all thine heart; and lean not unto thine own understanding. In all thy ways acknowledge him, and he shall direct thy paths.’16

Before the closing of the caskets, I noted that each child held a favorite toy, a soft gift to cuddle. I reflected on the words of the poet Eugene Field:

The little toy dog is covered with dust,

But sturdy and staunch he stands;

And the little toy soldier is red with rust,

And his musket moulds in his hands.

Time was when the little toy dog was new,

And the soldier was passing fair,

And that was the time when our Little Boy Blue

Kissed them and put them there.

“Now, don’t you go till I come,” he said,

“And don’t you make any noise!”

So toddling off to his trundle-bed

He dreamt of the pretty toys.

And, as he was dreaming, an angel song

Awakened our Little Boy Blue,—

Oh! the years are many, the years are long,

But the little toy friends are true!

Ay, faithful to Little Boy Blue they stand,

Each in the same old place,

Awaiting the touch of a little hand,

The smile of a little face.

And they wonder, as waiting the long years through,

In the dust of that little chair,

What has become of our Little Boy Blue

Since he kissed them and put them there.17

The little toy dog and the soldier fair may wonder, but God in His infinite mercy has not left grieving loved ones to wonder. He has provided truth. He will inspire an upward reach, and His outstretched arms will embrace you. Jesus promises to one and all who grieve, “I will not leave you comfortless: I will come to you.”18

There is only one source of true peace. I am certain that the Lord, who notes the fall of a sparrow, looks with compassion upon those who have been called upon to part—even temporarily—from their precious children. The gifts of healing and of peace are desperately needed, and Jesus, through His Atonement, has provided them for one and all.

The Prophet Joseph Smith spoke inspired words of revelation and comfort:

“All children who die before they arrive at the years of accountability are saved in the celestial kingdom of heaven.”19

“The mother [and father] who laid down [their] little child[ren], being deprived of the privilege, the joy, and the satisfaction of bringing [them] up to manhood or womanhood in this world, would, after the resurrection, have all the joy, satisfaction and pleasure, and even more than it would have been possible to have had in mortality, in seeing [their] child[ren] grow to the full measure of the stature of [their] spirit[s].”20 This is as the balm of Gilead to those who grieve, to those who have loved and lost precious children.

The Psalmist provided this assurance: “Weeping may endure for a night, but joy cometh in the morning.”21

Said the Lord: “Peace I leave with you, my peace I give unto you: not as the world giveth, give I unto you. Let not your heart be troubled, neither let it be afraid. … In my Father’s house are many mansions: if it were not so, I would have told you. I go to prepare a place for you … that where I am, there ye may be also.”22

I express my profound thanks to a loving Heavenly Father who gives to you, to me, and to all who sincerely seek, the knowledge that death is not the end, that His Son—even our Savior Jesus Christ—died that we might live. Temples of the Lord dot the lands of many countries. Sacred covenants are made. Celestial glory awaits the obedient. Families can be together forever.

The Master invites one and all:

“Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.

“Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me; for I am meek and lowly in heart: and ye shall find rest unto your souls.”23

Ideas for Home Teachers

After prayerfully studying this message, share it using a method that encourages the participation of those you teach. A few examples follow:

  1. Consider following up with family members on President Gordon B. Hinckley’s challenge in last month’s First Presidency Message to read the Book of Mormon (see “A Testimony Vibrant and True,” Liahona and Ensign, Aug. 2005, 2). You could ask family members to share something they have learned or tell about ways their study has been a blessing. Bear testimony of the truthfulness of the Book of Mormon.

  2. Discuss one or two accounts and scripture references (see the notes at the end of this article) from President Monson’s message. Ask family members to tell what they learn about the power of gratitude from these accounts and scriptures. Ask family members to discuss specific blessings they are grateful for. Express your gratitude for the Lord and His blessings.

  3. Read or tell in your own words the news article about Murray High School and the account regarding the deaths of five little girls. Ask what these illustrations teach about gratitude. Who was truly grateful in these accounts, and how did they show it? Invite each family member to express gratitude for something that has happened to him or her recently.

When upon life’s billows you are tempest-tossed,

When you are discouraged, thinking all is lost,

Count your many blessings; name them one by one,

And it will surprise you what the Lord has done.6

Notes

  1. Luke 17:11–19.

  2. Ps. 30:12.

  3. 2 Cor. 9:15.

  4. 1 Thes. 5:18.

  5. Alma 26:37.

  6. Johnson Oatman Jr. (1856–1922), “Count Your Blessings,” Hymns, no. 241.

  7. Congressional Record, 88th Cong., 1st sess., 1963, 109, pt. 7:9156.

  8. “Three Centuries of Thanksgiving,” Etude Music Magazine, Nov. 1945, 614.

  9. Alma 37:37.

  10. Ex. 20:12.

  11. John 19:26–27.

  12. Matt. 22:14.

  13. Marjorie Cortez, Deseret News, Sept. 26, 1997, pp. A1, A7.

  14. In Laurence J. Peter, Peter’s Quotations: Ideas for Our Time (1977), 335.

  15. See “5 Little Girls Die in [West Valley] Car Trunk,” Deseret News, Aug. 8, 1998, pp. A1, A7; Lucinda Dillon and Spencer Young, “Cars Pass Site of Tragedy in Solemn Stream,” Deseret News, Aug. 9, 1998, pp. A1, A5.

  16. Prov. 3:5–6.

  17. “Little Boy Blue,” in Jack M. Lyon and others, eds., Best-Loved Poems of the LDS People (1996), 50.

  18. John 14:18.

  19. D&C 137:10.

  20. Quoted in Joseph F. Smith, Gospel Doctrine, 5th ed. (1939), 453.

  21. Ps. 30:5.

  22. John 14:27, 2–3.

  23. Matt. 11:28–29.

You have our gratitude! By Joanna Fuchs. To view ALL our This Thanksgiving poem is perfect for a Thanksgiving greeting card message. Best Thanksgiving.

Guest House

An Inspiring Poem About Gratitude

Written by 13th Century Persian poet, Rumi
~~~~~

This being human is a guest house.

Every morning a new arrival.

A joy, a depression, a meanness,

some momentary awareness comes

As an unexpected visitor.

Welcome and entertain them all!

Even if they’re a crowd of sorrows,

who violently sweep your house

empty of its furniture,

still treat each guest honorably.

He may be clearing you out

for some new delight.

The dark thought, the shame, the malice,

meet them at the door laughing,

and invite them in.

Be grateful for whoever comes,

because each has been sent

as a guide from beyond.

My Thanksgiving Gratitude Message to You 2018




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16 Thanksgiving Poems

A collection of thanksgiving poems to share with others and to encourage us to be grateful for all the blessings we have in our lives.

Be Thankful
Poet Unknown

Be thankful that you don't already have everything you desire.
If you did, what would there be to look forward to?
Be thankful when you don't know something,
for it gives you the opportunity to learn.

Be thankful for the difficult times.
During those times you grow.
Be thankful for your limitations,
because they give you opportunities for improvement.
Be thankful for each new challenge,
because it will build your strength and character.

Be thankful for your mistakes.
They will teach you valuable lessons.
Be thankful when you're tired and weary,
because it means you've made a difference.

It's easy to be thankful for the good things.
A life of rich fulfillment comes to those who
are also thankful for the setbacks.
Gratitude can turn a negative into a positive.
Find a way to be thankful for your troubles,
and they can become your blessings.



"Thanksgiving, after all, is a word of action." W. J. Cameron - Thanksgiving Quotes


What's The Use
Poet: Douglas Malloch

What's the use of always weepin',
Making trouble last?
What's the use of always keepin'
Thinkin' of the past?
Each must have his tribulation -
Water with his wine;
Life, it ain't no celebration,
Trouble - I've had mine -
But today is fine!


Thankful For Many Things
Poet: Julie Hebert

I am thankful for my family,
My friends I feel the same.
Life is filled with many thanks,
Life is the perfect game.

Life is filled with treasures,
If you're a lucky one.
Be grateful and be humble,
And share them with someone.

But one thing we must remember,
We are not the one to thank.
There is a higher power here,
That we must give first rank.

I am thankful for my life,
And all that it holds.
I'm excited to see what's next for me,
Lets see how it unfolds.



"When one is thankful for the blessings in their life, they are choosing to attract more positivity and abundance." Michael Austin Jacobs
Blessed



In Everything Give Thanks
Poet: Unknown

For all that God in mercy sends -
For health and children, home and friends;
For comfort in the time of need,
For every kindly word and deed,
For happy talks and holy thoughts;
For guidance in our daily walk -
In everything give thanks!

For beauty in this world of ours,
For verdant grass and lovely flowers,
For song of birds, for horn of bees,
For the refreshing summer breeze,
For hill and plain, for streams and wood,
For the great ocean's mighty flood -
In everything give thanks!

For the sweet sleep which comes with night,
For the returning morning's light,
For the bright sun that shines on high,
For the stars glittering in the sky -
For these and everything we see,
O Lord our hearts we lift to thee;
In everything give thanks!



Words of Encouragement



Thanksgiving
Poet: Edgar A. Guest

Gettin' together to smile an' rejoice,
An' eatin' an' laughin' with folks of your choice;
An' kissin' the girls an' declarin' that they
Are growin more beautiful day after day;
Chattin' an' braggin' a bit with the men,
Buildin' the old family circle again;
Livin' the wholesome an' old-fashioned cheer,
Just for awhile at the end of the year.

Greetings fly fast as we crowd through the door
And under the old roof we gather once more
Just as we did when the youngsters were small;
Mother's a little bit grayer, that's all.
Father's a little bit older, but still
Ready to romp an' to laugh with a will.
Here we are back at the table again
Tellin' our stories as women an men.

Bowed are our heads for a moment in prayer;
Oh, but we're grateful an' glad to be there.
Home from the east land an' home from the west,
Home with the folks that are dearest an' best.
Out of the sham of the cities afar
We've come for a time to be just what we are.
Here we can talk of ourselves an' be frank,
Forgettin' position an' station an' rank.

Give me the end of the year an' its fun
When most of the plannin' an' toilin' is done;
Bring all the wanderers home to the nest,
Let me sit down with the ones I love best,
Hear the old voices still ringin' with song,
See the old faces unblemished by wrong,
See the old table with all of its chairs
An I'll put soul in my Thanksgivin' prayers.


Trees
Poet: Greta Zwaan, © 1978

Oh, the splendour of the autumn when the shades of colour glow;
When the trees dressed in their glory stir up shadows to and fro.

When the twilight sun is sinking, dusk embraces Mother Earth;
What a joy to catch the splendour, moments of unmeasured worth.

Stop a while and ponder nature, thank the Lord for all you see;
For our use and for their beauty, God created every tree.


A Special Day
Poet: Julie Hebert

Thanksgiving is a special day,
A day we give our thanks.
For all the people in our lives,
And the money in our banks.

Thanksgiving is a special day,
A day we share the joy.
We come before a lavish meal,
One we quite enjoy.

Thanksgiving is a special day,
Togetherness, all families the same.
Time spent in happiness,
We may even plan a game.

But most importantly Thanksgiving,
Is a day to remember.
Be grateful for all you have all year,
January straight through to December.



"Display, a life full of gratitude, and remember to give thanks each day."
Danielle Duckery
Gratitude



Thankful Heart
Poet: Henry Coyle

Father, we lift our thankful hearts to Thee
With gratitude, for all Thy bounty free,
For love, and friends, for home, for faith's pure light,
For health, for harvest store, for rest at night -

For every blessing showered from above -
Bestowed on us unstinted, by Thy Love
And thoughtful care; O hear us, as we pray,
Father in heaven, this Thanksgiving day.

Watch over us, be Thou our Stay and Guide,
Thro' day and night; guard us from sinful pride,
For we are human, weak and prone to wrong,
And by Thy grace alone are we made strong.

Give us our dally bread, our wants supply,
And touch our hearts that we may not deny
The widow and the orphan of their share
Of what we have - relieve their want and care.

O grant that we may keep Thy law, and live
A Christian life; our enemies forgive;
That we may love our neighbor, work for peace.
That so Thy glory may on earth increase.



"Give thanks not just on Thanksgiving Day, but every day of your life.
Appreciate and never take for granted all that you have."
Catherine Pulsifer
Appreciation Quotes



Give Thanks
Poet: Julie Hebert

The days we do give thanks,
We are grateful for what we were given.
The house, our family and friends,
And what waits for us in Heaven.

But there are more than the eye sees,
And more we should give thanks.
Our lives are more than people and objects,
Their more than what's in the banks.

Have you ever thought,
What it would be like.
To live in a world of anguish,
A world full of strife?

Be thankful for your surrounds,
The safety to walk down the street.
The schools and abilities to learn,
And the food we sit down to eat.



God Deserves The Credit
Poet: Greta Zwaan, © 2010

I have a goodly heritage, the blessings flow my way;
Great beauty, peace and majesty are granted me each day.
There's peace of mind and peace of heart and freedom in my land,
Not brought through what I have achieved, not by the will of man.

These are the gifts passed on from God, not something I have earned,
But grace and mercy touched God's heart, which man cannot discern.
Why should my God, a holy God, pay mind to lowly me?
While others are afflicted and longing to be free?

This land of grace, my Canada, that shines from coast to coast,
United Nations claims it's first! And, oh how we do boast!
Should not the credit go to God who made all things from dust?
Who gently holds the universe, whose power we can trust?

Yet man-made laws have ruined so much, directing his own way,
Not heeding laws that God assigned, but setting things array.
Oh, God, have mercy, turn us back, that we might seek Your face,
Forgive us for our wayward life, extend once more Your grace.

Create in us awareness of what You'd have us do,
Help us to recognize the fact that we owe all to You.


The key to being a wonderful writer is not to write. You just get out of the way.
Leave room for God to walk in the room. And when I write something that I know is right,
I get on my knees and say 'thank you.'
Michael Jackson
Thank You



Thanksgiving
Poet: Wilhelmina Stitch

Thank God for this!
That once again we are alive to greet the spring;
To smell the earth, fresh-washed with rain
To watch each little growing thing;
And, watching, feel each bud and leaf
Are symbols of the death of grief.
To think we're privileged to see laburnum's graceful gold cascade;
The pink and white fragility of dainty springtime's hill and glade;
And seeing, feel desire to praise
The Source of all these beauteous days.

Thank God for this!
That we can feel a burgeoning within the heart;
That springtime has the power to heal the wound of grief,
Its pain and smart;
Reveal a new and friendly earth where blossom joy and cheer and mirth.

Thank God for this!
We see His face framed in the loveliness of spring,
We see the workings of His grace in every little growing thing.
We see His face, we hear His voice
Bidding all downcast souls rejoice.



"This most of all is the message of Thanksgiving:
Everything really will be all right."
Sam Sifton, Thanksgiving
Inspirational Quotes



The ABC's of Thanksgiving
Poet: Unknown

Although things are not perfect;
Because of trail or pain;
Continue in Thanksgiving;
Do not begin to blame;

Even when the times are hard;
Fierce winds are bound to blow;
God is forever able;
Hold on to what you know;

Imagine life without His love;
Joy would cease to be;
Keep thanking Him for all the things;
Love imparts to thee;

Move out of "Camp complaining";
No weapon that is known;
On earth can yield the power;
Praise can do alone;

Quit looking at the future;
Redeem the time at hand;
Start every day with worship;
To "thank" is a command;

Until we see Him coming;
Victorious in the sky;
We'll run the race with gratitude;
Xalting God most high;

Yes, there’ll be good times and yes some will be bad; but . . .
Zion waits in glory...where none are ever sad!


Night's Blessings
Poet: Eldred Herbert

When I go to bed and cannot sleep,
I don't waste time by counting sheep;
I count all my blessings, one by one,
From the early morn tiill the settling sun;
The day so new, the sunrise so clear,
I started my day with thankful prayer;
Thanked God for husband and children two,
Freckled-face boy, girl with eyes of blue.

Thanked God for ability to work,
And from life's battle I did not shirk;
I thanked Him for guidance through the day,
He is my Buckler from tempter's sway.
And when I was tempted to be rude,
I turned to my Lord in solitude;
His strength sufficient, my soul restored,
Just one more blessing from the Lord.

When day is done and I lay in bed,
I feel God's blessing upon me spread.
If you are restless and cannot sleep,
Just count your blessing's instead of sheep;
You will find the solitude is right,
You will feel His presence in the night;
Then rest shall come, repose in sleep,
When you count blessings instead of sheep.


What Am I Really Thankful For?
Poet: Greta Zwaan, © 1979

What am I really thankful for? Abundant supply, enough and more?
A warm, cozy home with carpeted floor? Safety behind the lock on my door?
Oh, yes, I admit I take comfort in these: the joys of my life, the pleasures, the ease.
I’m happy for freedom to do as I please, attend social evening and afternoon teas.
Consider the fact that I've worked to obtain, through the strength of my body, material gain.

I accomplished great things, I did it with strain, sometimes with heartache and even with pain.
But I've carved for myself a name that is known, important position, esteem that has grown.
Perhaps, in the process I've trampled a few who could not decipher the tricks that I knew,
Some gullible men who trusted my word, they accepted my plans and all that they heard.

But when you consider the gains that I've made, I can't stop to worry or go to their aid.
We all know the saying, "Look out for your own," so I'm my own maker, a fact that's well known.
Perhaps in the future I'll ease off a bit, but now is the time to "get all you can get.'
Maybe tomorrow I’ll think about God, and even consider His staff and His rod.

Someone once told me He created the earth, upholds and sustains it, and gave all things birth.
I'm really not certain that that could be true; I do believe that your life's up to you.
If God is creator and all man is His, then why do I struggle just to find bliss?
I’ve worked since my childhood to get what I craved, to find satisfaction from earnings I’ve saved.

I'm still not content, there's got to be more - the end of the rainbow, that faraway shore.
I'll keep on achieving and persevere through; it's my only solution, that's all I can do.
If you find a method that’s better than mine, I wish you would tell me or write me a line.
A way of rejoicing, for peace and contentment; a satisfied heart and no more resentment.

I've not much time left for I'm climbing in years, and as I grow older I'm discovering fears:
Fears of tomorrow, of things that might be; if you have the answer then help set me free.
I've no other method, I've no other way, but if you can help me, then help me TODAY!!



Thanksgiving
Poet: James Whitcomb Riley, 1849 - 1916

Let us be thankful - not only because
Since last our universal thanks were told
We have grown greater in the world’s applause,
And fortune's newer smiles surpass the old -

But thankful for all things that come as alms
From out the open hand of Providence: -
The winter clouds and storms - the summer calms -
The sleepless dread - the drowse of indolence.

Let us be thankful - thankful for the prayers
Whose gracious answers were long, long delayed,
That they might fall upon us unawares,
And bless us, as in greater need we prayed.

Let us be thankful for the loyal hand
That love held out in welcome to our own,
When love and only love could understand
The need of touches we had never known.

Let us be thankful for the longing eyes
That gave their secret to us as they wept,
Yet in return found, with a sweet surprise,
Love's touch upon their lids, and, smiling, slept.

And let us, too, be thankful that the tears
Of sorrow have not all been drained away,
That through them still, for all the coming years,
We may look on the dead face of To-day.


Barren Trees
Poet: Greta Zwaan, © 2014

The summer sun has weakened, its rays no longer strong;
The leaves have changed their colors; it's fall before too long.
The trees have become barren; the wind removed their clothes;
Forlorn they stand there naked, reflecting on their woes.

In spring they're rich with blossoms, their fragrance fills the air;
Proud sentinels, like soldiers, they move and sway with flair.
Their summer fruit is plenteous, their boughs bent down with weight;
Delicious, sun-drenched offerings, the quality first rate!

Then comes the fall, the harvest, the fruit is gathered in;
The trees have done their duty, they've served their land again.
But now they're not producing, they'll have a well-earned rest;
And mankind might applaud them; they've done their very best.


Related:
Christian Poems    |     Christmas Poems

How do you give thanks? For some people, Thanksgiving is a time to talk.

Rumi Gratitude Poem

We are so excited to reveal the cover for the poetry anthology THANKU: POEMS OF GRATITUDE, illustrated by Marlena Myles and edited by WNDB Mentorship Program Co-Chair Miranda Paul. The book will be released on September 3, 2019, by Millbrook Press, an imprint of Lerner Publishing Group.

 

Book description:

How do you give thanks?

For some people, Thanksgiving is a time to talk about feeling thankful. But gratitude isn’t something we need to save up for a special holiday. What are you grateful for right now, today?

This anthology brings together a diverse group of poets who express gratitude for everything from a puppy to hot cocoa to the sky itself. Each writer uses a different poetic form, and readers will encounter a concrete poem, a sonnet, a pantoum, a sijo, and much more. Stunning illustrations from Marlena Myles invite close examination, making this a collection to return to and savor again and again.

A portion of the proceeds from this anthology will be donated to We Need Diverse Books.

 

 

Marlena Myles on the cover illustration:

One of my primary inspirations is observing nature and paying attention to the small details. I’m always amazed seeing plants growing in the strangest places, overcoming any disadvantages to thrive and bloom. When I see children, I see in them the same power to flourish. The seeds on the cover represent both the young readers on their different journeys in life and the poems in the book–passing along, nurturing thoughts and stories for young minds.

 

 

Miranda Paul on the cover and the collection:

I’d like to add that Marlena’s artwork is remarkable for many reasons, one of them being the way she brought cohesion to 32 poems from poets who had no idea what anyone else was working about. She seamlessly ties in the whimsical with the serious tones to make a book that truly appeals to the very young and even the middle grade or adult readers. The whole book feels like one work of art and yet a diverse and ranging collection all at the same time. It is both a highly useful book and a beautiful gift item.

I’m also proud that proceeds will be benefiting other writers and readers through WNDB. This project has been steeped in goodness on so many levels. It is my honor and privilege to have been able to facilitate its creation.

poems on gratitude and thanksgiving

WATCH THE VIDEO ON THEME: Word Mic - Spoken Word Poetry "Gratitude"

Develop an attitude of gratitude, and give thanks for everything that happens to you, knowing that every step forward is a step toward achieving something.

poems on gratitude and thanksgiving
Written by Mikalkree
5 Comments
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