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Thank you for the opportunto to interview email
April 02, 2019 Teacher Thanks 4 comments

Job interview thank you letter examples

A thank-you letter can help you seal the deal after an interview. Use this sample to craft one that can help boost your candidacy.

A follow-up letter is a necessary part of a job interview.

Do you know that most applicants don’t send a post-interview thank-you letter?

Even if you think an offer is in the bag, you can always improve your chances of getting the job if you send thank-you notes. Your letter should reiterate your core strengths and emphasize the value you offer. You can even squelch any concerns the employer raised about your qualifications and add important information you didn’t get to discuss in the interview.

Check out this sample thank-you letter:

John Smith
14 Elm St. Sometown, CA 55555 555-555-5555 [email protected]

[Date]

Ms. Amy Lin
Manager
ABC Company
1 Corporate Way
Sometown, CA 55555

Dear Ms. Lin:

Thank you for meeting with me this morning to discuss the executive assistant position. I enjoyed our conversation, and I am very excited about the possibility of joining your team.

I know what it takes to run a busy and successful insurance office. In my last position as an administrative assistant for XYZ Company, I helped manage all aspects of the operation, handling tasks such as bookkeeping, customer service, claims processing, report preparation and ongoing communications with the district manager.

You mentioned that you need an assistant who has strong “people” skills, and this is an area in which I excel. At XYZ Company, I helped the manager build a loyal client base by consistently providing excellent service. My last supervisor said, “John is one of the hardest-working employees I have known. His friendly and professional customer-service skills helped the firm achieve a 20 percent revenue increase last year, and I couldn’t have done it without him.”

I don’t see the executive assistant role as a punch-the-clock, 9-to-5 job; I will be your “right hand”—helping you manage the day-to-day operations, volunteering for special projects, and ensuring the company is positioned for growth and increased profitability.

Again, thank you for considering me for this exciting opportunity. As you requested, I’m enclosing a list of professional references. Please feel free to call me if you need additional information, have any questions or would like to offer me the job! Thank you for your time, and I look forward to hearing from you.

Sincerely,

John Smith

Enclosure: List of References

Ready to send out some thank-you letters? Do this next

Gratitude is always welcome, but before you can start sending out a few good thank-you notes, you'll need to nab some job interviews. Not sure how to get started? We can help. Join Monster today. As a member, you can get job alerts sent directly to your inbox, plus you can upload up to five versions of your resume and cover letter. Recruiters search Monster every day looking to fill top jobs with outstanding candidates—just like you. Get your stationery ready (we'll also be expecting a note).


There are many components of a successful job interview, including thorough preparation, confident body language, professional presentation, and clear articulation of your skills and experience. Once you’ve mastered all of these details and walk out of the interview, it can be easy to overlook a last important step: the thank you email.

Many job seekers, especially Big Interview readers, understand that it is a good practice to promptly send a thank you email to their interviewer. How and what to say, however, may be less clear.

Although it is highly likely you expressed polite thanks to your interviewer in person, an intentional, well-worded note of thanks can separate you from the competition and keep you fresh in the interviewer’s mind.

Why Send a Post-Interview “Thank You” Email?

A thank you note is considered a common courtesy after a job interview and demonstrates polished professionalism. Showing your appreciation for your interviewer’s time will solidify the rapport you established. Conversely, the absence of this gesture, at a time where putting your best foot forward is expected, could hurt your chances of landing the job.

Beyond exercising manners and business etiquette, the thank-you email presents you with a golden opportunity to re-sell yourself.

Perhaps you missed cues to present some of your talking points, leaving your interviewer without a full understanding of your skills. Your thank-you email is your chance to fill any possible gap and reinforce your fit for the job.

Timing is Everything

Of the factors that contribute to an effective thank-you note, the timing is perhaps the most sensitive. You’ll want to begin writing your email as soon as possible to ensure you have time to make it great.

The completed thank-you email should arrive in the interviewer’s inbox within 24 hours of the interview. Too much later, and you may have already been forgotten.

Note: Email thank-you notes are now considered the standard and always appropriate. We are often asked about when it would be better to write and mail a physical thank-you note.

It’s always possible that some, more traditional interviewers may appreciate receiving a thank-you note or card in the mail. It’s true that a mailed card will may help you stand out.

However, there’s also a chance this gesture could make you seem less responsive (takes longer) or tech-savvy. I would recommend sending your thanks via email in almost all cases. If you are dealing with a more traditional interviewer or company, you can address this in the tone and content of your thank-you email.

Be sure to steer clear of odd hours of the night. If the interviewer even manages to find your email buried in memos and junk mail, it may seem strange that you were up at 3am.

If you can manage it, one effective strategy is to send the email around the time when the interviewer first arrives at work the next morning; your note will be front and center.

Anatomy of the Ideal Interview Thank You Email – from Top to Bottom

Subject Line: Definitely include one. An email with a “no subject” line comes across as lazy and is easy to ignore. When you create your subject line, it should be specific and attention grabbing, but don’t try to be too creative. Make it clear what the email will be about by using the words “thank you” and perhaps the position title.

Salutation: When addressing your note, keep it professional, and accurate. Writing down “Dear Mr./Ms./Dr. *Last Name*” is always a solid choice. Make sure you know exactly how the interviewer’s last name is spelled. (If you have multiple interviewers, send separate emails, and double check to make sure you have correct names and emails matched up properly).

Be careful to check your assumptions! For instance, if the interviewer was a woman, do not assume that you can address her as “Mrs.,” even if you know she is married. Stick to “Ms.” in this case and you will be safe. (And make sure you always use the “Dr.” prefix when applicable!)

Opening paragraph: Now comes the part where you say, “thank you.” Begin your note with a sincere expression of gratitude for the time that was taken to speak with you (e.g “I appreciate the time you took to speak with me…”)

After this, you will want to grab their attention with a compliment about the interview process in some way, a key takeaway about the position or company that excites you, and how this takeaway solidifies your confidence in your ability to be the best fit for the job.

This will help the recruiter feel good about reading your note, let them know you paid attention, and reassure them of your interest.

Body: While keeping your email brief, you can use an additional 1-2 paragraphs to remind the interviewer of your best selling points and continue building rapport. Here are some ideas:

Focus on your fit. Confidently assert your top selling points that align with the top job requirements. This can be an opportunity to mention something that didn’t come up in the interview or that you feel, in retrospect, you didn’t articulate well.

Reference something specific about your conversation.This helps to show you were interested and listening and may jog the reader’s memory about your interview.

Reiterate your interest. You can mention how the interview (and perhaps specific information provided by the interview) made you even more interested in the opportunity. Or if you forgot to ask good questions at the end of the interview, you may include one here, as an alternate way of showing your interest and engagement.

Keep tone in mind. Be professional, but also aware of the culture of the office. For example, if your desired position requires creativity or upbeat customer relations, make sure your note doesn’t come off too stiff.

Know your reader. Tailor your note to what you know about the reader. If you’re dealing with a busy senior manager, keep the note short and sweet and focused on the bottom line. If your interviewer was very focused on a particular job requirement, think about leading with a comment about it.

In all cases, remember to be professional, concise, and to the point.

Conclusion: It is always appropriate to say “thank you” again in some way as you are wrapping up your note. You can also use your conclusion to emphasize your interest in the position and express your desire to move forward in the hiring process.

If the interviewer mentioned a specific time frame in which to expect a follow-up, it is okay to reference that in your conclusion.

However, if no time frame was mentioned, creating one of your own (e.g “I look forward to hearing back from you next week”) may come across as pushy.

You should also include an invitation for the interviewer to contact you at any time if they have further questions (make sure your contact info is included in the sentence or in your email signature!). This is a subtle inclusion in the interview thank you email that candidates often forget.

Sign off: The tried and true signature of “Sincerely, Your First and Last Name” is always a safe bet. If another sign off has worked for you in a professional setting before, especially if it found you success on your cover letter, then stick with it.

Below your signature, make sure to include your full contact information, and any relevant links, such as a LinkedIn profile or online portfolio.

Interview “Thank You” Sample Email (and Template)

Subject Line: Thank You | Senior Project Manager Interview

Dear Ms. Smith,

I greatly appreciate the time you took to meet with me yesterday afternoon to discuss the Senior Project Manager Position. I enjoyed learning more about the company and especially the details you shared about the collaborative culture, which is something I really value.

I am now even more excited about the position and my fit for the role. In addition to my record of organizing successful project launches under strict deadlines, I also have extensive multimedia production and editing experience.

I also have experience successfully streamlining project processes in my current role and know that skill would be valuable in meeting your goals for making processes more consistent across the team.

Please let me know if there is any additional information you need from me. Thank you again for your time. I hope to hear back from you and have the opportunity to continue our discussion about the role.

Sincerely,
First Name Last Name”

[email address]

[phone number]

[links]

Why This Thank-You Email Works

For starters, this note is delivered in a timely manner (within 24 hours of the interview). The subject line makes it obvious to the recruiter that this is a thank-you note.

The greeting uses the appropriate title and sounds professional.

This note starts out well by showing gratitude and referencing specific, helpful information provided in the interview.

In the body, the job seeker reiterates enthusiasm for the role and then summarizes his key selling points for the position. The third paragraph references new information shared in the interview (goal of making processes more consistent) and how this candidate could be an asset.

In the conclusion, the writer offers to provide any additional information needed and expresses interest in moving forward in the process.

Overall, it’s a concise, professional note that shows the candidate was paying attention and reinforces both a positive attitude and positive qualifications for the position.

Smoothing out the Edges

When you have a draft of your interview thank-you email complete, you will want to proofread it at least twice. You don’t want to rely on the spellcheck and grammar correction tools alone.

Double-check the spelling of names, your sentence structure, and if any words you intended to use are missing. After you have done your best to polish your thank-you email draft, get a second pair of eyes on it if you can. You will be surprised at how quickly a fresh perspective will reveal some of the details you may have overlooked.

Thank-You Emails for Panel Interviews

You did get a business card from each interviewer, right? They will prove to be very helpful when faced with writing thank-you notes after a panel interview.

If more than one person was involved in your interview process, each person should receive an individualized thank-you email. While this may seem time consuming, it can set you apart from other of candidates. After all, each member of the panel was there because they have a vote in the hiring process. You want to win all of them over.

Do your best to remember highlights of the interview from each person involved. You may even consider refreshing your memory by writing notes on the back of each business card as soon as you return from your interview. Include a few unique details in each of your thank-you notes to create a genuine reconnection with everyone involved in your interview process, and to ideally get them talking to each other about wanting to hire you.

With the job market as competitive as it is, job seekers need to do everything they can to connect with interviewers and stand out from the competition. Using these tools, your carefully-constructed thank-you email could be what closes the deal and earns you the job offer.

(For even more advice on thank you notes, read our full lessons inside the Big Interview curriculum, or check out our post Job Interview Thank You Notes 101)

Alia Hollback

Interview thank you email examples, what to include, when to send it, and tips for writing to express your appreciation for the opportunity to meet with them.

Here at Career Contessa, any time we interview a job candidate, we wait to see whether they'll write a thank you note or not. You'd be surprised how often they don't—and that's right about when we decide not to hire them. 

Sending a thank you note after the interview can really set you apart from other candidates. By drafting and sending a thoughtful thank you note, you are signaling your continued interest and solidifies a positive impression with the interviewer. And you know what else? It's just plain good manners to say thank you. 

I’ve actually had hiring managers tell me to wait to schedule a second interview until we receive a post-interview follow-up email, and we've skipped hiring someone at Career Contessa when because we don't receive a thank you (it's one of our 11 reasons why you don't get a job offer). Yup, saying thank you is that important.

What to Say in A Stellar Post-Interview Thank You Note

Avoid only going through the motions, because employers will see right through a generic note. Instead, tailor your message to the specific interviewer and company using a flexible format like so:

The 5-Part Thank You Template 

  • How much you appreciated the meeting (the “thank you” part!)
  • Something specific about the interview or items discussed
  • Why you are excited about this opportunity
  • A brief explanation of why you’d be a good fit for the job
  • Next steps and your contact information

When to Send A Post-Interview Thank You Note 

Send it immediately, ASAP!

Make sure to send the note (via email) within 24 hours—and be sure to send one to everyone you interviewed with, not just the hiring manager. Even if you interview on a Friday afternoon—maybe especially if you interview on a Friday afternoon, make sure to send that thank you email before starting your weekend activities. 

This really shows the hiring manager that you appreciate the time she took, her thoughtfully-prepared interview questions, and the job at hand. 

a Sample Post-Interview Thank You Email Template 

Still not sure what to write? Here's an example of a short and sweet post-interview thank you note (the keyword here being short—when it comes to interview follow-up emails, less is usually more):

Dear [interviewer name],

Thank you again for taking the time to speak with me about the [job title] position and for giving me additional insight into the responsibilities and day-to-day duties involved. Our conversation today only increased my interest in the role. I would be thrilled to use my [insert a skill or two that you discussed in your interview, such as "editorial skills and background research and interviewing"] to benefit [company name] and your goals, including the work you're doing on [insert a specific example of a project or work your interviewer mentioned, such as "expanding into video and other multimedia content"].

Please don’t hesitate to reach out if you have additional questions for me! I look forward to having another conversation with you soon. 

Best regards,

[Name]
[Email address]
[Phone number]

Looking for more interview advice? Check out our YouTube Channel:

Bonus: A Thank you note template for after a second interview

We get this question often, so I wanted to cover it here as well: when you're asked in for a follow-up interview, you should send another thank you note via email (again, within 24 hours). Send it to everyone who is involved. Really, the process doesn't vary too much from the first interview thank you note, except that you'll want to make it shorter. One trick I love is to expand on a topic you covered with your interviewer in your second meeting. Here's a template: 

Hi [interviewer name],

It was a pleasure speaking with you again today about the [position]. I loved hearing more about [a project or goal that came up in your latest interview]—and can't wait to potentially help your team on it! As always, please let me know if you have any questions or if I can send any additional information your way. I'm looking forward to moving forward in this process!

Regards,

[Name]

Simple enough, right? If you don't hear back right away, that's OK—wait about 5-7 days before following up (you can reply to your original thank you note) and expressing interest one more time. 

Here's an example of the perfect thank you email, according to Yale career experts

thank you for the opportunto to interview email

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If you want to create a strong professional brand and leave a lasting impression with employers, you need to master the post- interview thank you email.

As soon as you leave a job interview, it’s best to follow up with a sincere, professional, and engaged thank you email. Make sure they know you appreciate their time and attention in meeting with you!

Before we dig into the mechanics of a great interview thank you email, though, know this: sending an email is not a replacement for sending a handwritten thank you note to your interviewer. I always advise folks to do both after an in-person interview. But it will take a day or two for your beautiful thank you card to arrive on your interviewer’s doorstep. Email has the advantage of delivering an instant dose of gratitude to the people who have the power to give you the job of your dreams.

When writing your post-interview thank you email, keep these three things in mind:

  1. Keep it short: You don’t need to compose a long letter. Busy professionals already have too much email to read. So keep it short and sweet.
  2. Keep it professional: Focus on the topics you previously discussed with the interviewer. This isn’t a time to go into personal details.
  3. Customize it: It’s okay to follow a general template with your thank you emails, but make sure to add enough customization that your message doesn’t look like a bad “cut-and-paste” job. In every email, reference something specific to your previous conversation. At the very least, make sure you include the right company name and job title!

To help you out, I built three email templates for you to follow. Use these templates as a guide to build your own personal rockstar thank you email to send after job interviews!

Template for a Thank You Email After an Informational Interview

Are you conducting informational interviews with people in your industry? Informational interviews are casual one-on-one networking sessions, and they are one of the best ways to build a professional network and get the inside track on jobs. If someone has taken time out of their busy schedule to meet with you, you absolutely must send them a thank you email. Because showing some courtesy is the best way to leave a good impression with this valuable new professional contact. Plus, it’s a great way to start an ongoing correspondence so that you can start to build a professional relationship long-term.

Here’s my template for a thank you email after an informational interview or any personal meeting with a new contact:

Subject Line: Thank you from [[your name]]

Dear [[Contact Name]],

Thank you for taking time from your busy schedule to meet with me today. It was great to discuss career opportunities in [[industry/company/location]] with you! Your comments were insightful and gave me lots of ideas for my ongoing job search. I’m excited to follow up on your suggestions to [[contact/attend/apply]].

It was especially exciting to talk to you about [[reference the highlight from the conversation you had.]]

Again, your suggestions and time are so appreciated, and I hope to chat again soon! Please let me know how if there is a way I can return the favor, now or in the future.

Regards,

[[Your name]]
[[Your LinkedIn URL]]

Template for a Thank You Email After a Phone Interview

An employer may conduct phone interviews, or phone screens, with a dozen or more applicants for every job opening. You’re in a crowded field of candidates, all vying for the opportunity to interview in-person. One way to differentiate yourself is to craft a considerate post-interview thank you email as soon as you get off the phone.

Subject Line: Thank you for your time today.

Dear [[Contact Name]],

I appreciate having the opportunity to speak with you today about the [[job title]] position at [[company name]]. After our conversation, I’m very excited about this opportunity. I believe my skills and interests are a perfect match for this role.

I am particularly interested in [[aspect of job or hiring organization.]]

[[Add personal note, specific to the conversation or share a link to something you mentioned in conversation, like your personal website.]]

I appreciate the time you took to interview me today, and I look forward to having the opportunity to meet you in person.

If you need any additional information from me, please feel free to contact me at any time.

Again, thank you for your time and consideration.

Sincerely,

[[Your Name]]
[[Your LinkedIn URL]]

Template for a Thank You Email After a Job Interview (In-Person)

An in-person job interview is a huge opportunity. And employers tell us that the way candidates follow up is an important indicator of their interest in the position. Candidates who go silent after the interview come across as disinterested. So if you really want the job, take the time to write a sincere, customized email immediately after you end the interview, and send it the same day.

Subject Line: Thank you from [[Your Name]] – [[Position]]

Dear [[Contact Name]],

Thank you, again, for the time you spent with me today. I really enjoyed meeting you and exploring how I might be able to assist [[Organization]] as the new [[Job Title]].

After our conversations, I am even more confident that this position is a job I would enjoy, as well as one where I can be successful and make a valuable contribution.

I am particularly excited about [[aspect of job, particular challenge discussed, or note about the organization.]]

[[Add a personal note that is specific to the conversation or share a promised resource.]]

You mentioned that the decision on this position will be made in [[time frame provided by employer]]. In the meantime, if there is any additional information you need from me please let me know and I’ll get it over to you!

Again, I appreciate the chance to interview with [[Organization]] and am grateful for the time you spent with me.

Sincerely,

[[Your Name]]
[[Your LinkedIn URL]]

 

There you have it! Follow these templates, and make extra sure to customize them to your own voice and situation. Before you know it, you’ll be perfecting your interview follow-up and hearing back after more interviews. I’ll wish you luck with your next interview, because I know you’ve got the thank you email covered.

WATCH THE VIDEO ON THEME: How to Follow up After a Job Interview - Training Module 7

Take advantage of this opportunity by sending a thank-you letter after you have interview and especially after an interview associated with a company visit.

Formal Job Interview Thank You Note Samples

After the second round of interviews for a new job, you will need to send a thank-you note to your interviewer, even if the same person interviewed you the first time. Sometimes a second thank-you note can be hard to write — after all, haven't you already said everything you had to say in your first letter? Instead of seeing it as a meaningless hurdle, try thinking about your thank-you letter as an opportunity.

What to Expect From a Second Interview

When you are invited back for a second interview, you are likely one of the top contenders for the job. Usually, only a select few candidates are called in for the second round of meetings, and the interview will reflect that higher level of expectations.

During your second interview, you’ll be discussing things more in-depth than in the first interview. You might meet other members of the team, or talk in more technical terms about what the position entails. By a second-round interview, companies are usually close to a decision and are possibly weighing only two potential candidates.

How to Follow Up After the Interview

After the second interview, it's a good idea to send a second thank-you note or email message. In fact, it's especially important after a second interview to take the time to write a personal message to the people who interviewed you - even if you interviewed with them already and thanked them for the first interview. Many employers expect you to reply promptly.

Your second interview thank-you letter gives you another opportunity to reiterate your interest in the position, reference your most relevant qualifications, and thank the interviewer for taking the time to speak with you. You can add some depth to your second thank-you by referencing new information or contacts you gained during the follow-up interview.

Who to Thank and How to Address Your Note

If there was more than one interviewer, you should thank each interviewer separately. Each one gets his or her own handwritten note or email message; do not “cc” all of your interviewers in a single email thank-you letter.

By a second-round interview, you may be on more familiar terms with the interviewer. If that's the case, you can be a bit less formal in your note — you may want to address the interviewer by their first name, for instance. Of course, your thank-you letter should still be written as proper business correspondence, and carefully checked for grammar and typos.

When to Send Your Email or Note

Your second interview note, whether hand-written or emailed, should be sent no later than 24 hours after the interview.

What to Include in Your Message or Note

When writing a second interview thank-you note, it's important to specifically state why you are the best candidate for the job. Since you made it to the second interview, the stakes are high and you are definitely being compared to other highly-ranked candidates for the position. Thus, this second thank-you note needs to serve as a strong self-marketing statement. There may be something you forgot to mention during the interview - so this is an opportunity to bring it up.

A second thank-you note is also a chance for you to enthusiastically reiterate your interest in the position and in the company. Be sure to mention something unique and specific that you and your interviewer discussed the organization, their company culture, or their mission, as they likely have interviewed several people. This will help jog their memory about your interview and allow you to stand out from your competition.

You should use your thank-you note to persuasively reinforce the ways your skills and experience are a good match for the position for which you interviewed. Your thank-you note should also reflect the differences in tone between the interviews.

You can also inquire in your thank-you note if you haven't already during your in-person interview if the interviewer needs any additional details from you, and about the timeline for a hiring decision. Try not to repeat your first note too closely. If you have additional points to make, you should, but it’s fine to keep your note short and to the point if you don't have a lot to say.

Finally, repeat your thanks for the second interview and request that the interviewing committee keeps you updated on the status of their candidate search.

Thank-You Note Samples for a Second Interview

Download the Word Template


Thank-You Note Samples for a Second Interview (Text Version)

Here are some thank-you note examples to send after a second interview.

Sample #1 - Thank You Letter (Text Only)

Barry Applicant
123 Main Street
Anytown, CA 12345
555-555-5555
barry.applicant@email.com

September 1, 2018

Jim Lee
Vice President of Marketing
Acme Marketing
123 Business Rd.
Business City, NY 54321

Dear Mr. Lee:

Thank you for taking the time to interview me for the second time. I appreciate your continuing interest in my candidacy for the Marketing Director position.

As we discussed, my strong skill set and my experience with ABC Company in a very similar role would enable me to assume strong leadership, immediately providing the guidance and expertise to improve departmental performance exponentially. I was interested in learning more about your vision for the department’s growth during our discussion, and am excited about having the opportunity to introduce methods to quickly reach these goals.

Thank you again for your consideration; I look forward to hearing from you.

Best regards,

Barry Applicant

Sample #2 - Email Message (Text Only)

Subject:Thank You

Dear Brittney,

It was great to meet with you about the masseuse position at ABC Wellness Center. During my initial interview with Lindsay, I got a terrific insight into the way you integrate total wellness into your program. I was glad to have the opportunity to share with you some of the ways that I think my specialization would fit in with your approach.

Thank you for considering me for the position. I look forward to hearing from you in the next few days.

Regards,

Alexa Smith
alexasmith123@email.com
123-444-5555 cell

Make sure to prepare and dress appropriately, as this is your chance to clinch the job.

This is a final chance to make the case for choosing you for the role.

thank you for the opportunto to interview email

How to Write a Thank You Note/Email After an Interview. BONUS: It sounds like an exciting opportunity, and an opportunity I could succeed and excel in!.

thank you for the opportunto to interview email
Written by Fer
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